philo''s alexandria

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Psychology Press, 1996 - History - 200 pages
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First-century Alexandria vied with Rome to be the greatest city of the Roman empire. More than half a million people lived in its cosmopolitan four square miles. It was a major centre for international trade and shipping.
Little remains of Alexandria's golden age. Few papyrus records of the city survive. Archaeologists' attempts to reveal its past have been frustrated by years of subsidence, earthquakes and continuous demolition and rebuilding. Our main guide to the city is Philo, an Alexandrian Jew, who, sometimes inadvertently, incorporated information about his home city into his copious religious writings.
In this compelling new study, Dorothy I. Sly searches through Philo's treatises for information about Alexandria. By recognizing his shortcomings and prejudices, and questioning his judgements, she builds up an authentic picture of city life in the first century.
 

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Contents

A MAN EMINENT ON ALL ACCOUNTS
1
FOUNDED TO SATISFY THE SOARING
19
HOPE OF SAFETY TO THE VOYAGER
36
THE MAGNANIMITY OF PTOLEMY II
52
AMOURS AND ADULTERIES AND
65
IN THE MIDST OF THE MARKETPLACE
83
WHOLESALE DEPRIVATION OF ALL THAT
99
AND TEMPERANCE AND JUSTICE
120
AN ART OF HEALING THAT TREATS
138
SUPERINTENDENCE IN SICKNESS
149
IN A CITY NOT THEIR OWN
167
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About the author (1996)

Dorothy I.Sly is an associate professor of Religious Studies at the University,Ontario.She is the author of Philo's Perception of Women(1990).

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