Loyalty and Loss: Alabama's Unionists in the Civil War and Reconstruction

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LSU Press, Sep 1, 2004 - History - 320 pages
Though slavery was widespread and antislavery sentiment rare in Alabama, there emerged a small loyalist population, mostly in the northern counties, that persisted in the face of overwhelming odds against their cause. Margaret M. Storey’s welcome study uncovers and explores those Alabamians who maintained allegiance to the Union when their state seceded in 1861—and beyond. Storey’s extensive, groundbreaking research discloses a socioeconomically diverse group that included slaveholders and nonslaveholders, business people, professionals, farmers, and blacks. By considering the years 1861–1874 as a whole, she clearly connects loyalists’ sometimes brutal wartime treatment with their postwar behavior.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Political Culture of Loyalism
18
Resisting the Confederate Draft
56
Unionists Slaves
87
Unionists Slaves and the Federal Counterinsurgency
133
Stripped Twice By The Limits of Presidential Reconstruction
170
Radical Activism and Klan Backlash
196
Epilogue
232
Questions Used in Interrogation by the Southern Claims
244
Demographic Tables
254
Bibliography
263
Index
287
Index of Loyal Alabamians
293
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About the author (2004)

Margaret M. Storey is professor of history at DePaul University in Chicago.