The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 7

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J. Bohn, 1845 - Philosophy, English - 11 pages
 

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Page 184 - Geometry therefore is demonstrable, for the lines and figures from which we reason are drawn and described by ourselves; and civil philosophy is demonstrable, because we make the commonwealth ourselves.
Page 183 - Of arts, some are demonstrable, others indemonstrable; and demonstrable are those the construction of the subject whereof is in the power of the artist himself, who, in his demonstration, does no more but deduce the consequences of his own Operation.
Page 242 - ... rotten beneath his feet he has the power of sustaining himself by raising an unseen prop, or somewhat extending his base, without allowing the reader to think that he is employing any art to retain his position. His self-confidence was never disturbed. With unmatched presumption he affirms that he is " the first that hath made the grounds of geometry firm and coherent.
Page 5 - ... apology for my Leviathan ; not that I rely upon apologies, but upon your majesty's most gracious general pardon. That which is in it of theology contrary to the general current of divines is not put there as my opinion, but propounded with submission to those who have the power ecclesiastical, — I did never after, either in writing or discourse, maintain it.
Page 184 - ... own operation. The reason whereof is this, that the science of every subject is derived from a precognition of the causes, generation, and construction of the same; and consequently where the causes are known, there is place for demonstration, but not where the causes are to seek for. Geometry therefore is demonstrable, for the lines and figures from which we reason are drawn and described by ourselves; and civil philosophy is demonstrable, because we mak^e the commonwealth ourselves.
Page 408 - Catonem, avunculum tuum, quum in senatu sententiam diceret, locos graves ex philosophia tractare, abhorrentes ab hoc usu forensi et publico ; sed dicendo consequi tamen, ut illa etiam populo probabilia viderentur.
Page 336 - framed the minds of a thousand gentlemen to a conscientious obedience to present government, which otherwise would have wavered in that...
Page 329 - For the conception of the lines and figures .... must proceed from words either spoken or thought upon. So that there is a double labour of the mind, one to reduce your symbols to words, which are also symbols, another to attend to the ideas which they signify.
Page 350 - Do you think I can be an atheist and not know it ? Or knowing it, durst have offered my atheism to the press...
Page 5 - I to do to meddle with matters of that nature, seeing that religion is not philosophy, but law ? It was written in a time when the pretence of Christ's kingdom was made use of for the most horrid actions that can be imagined ; and it was in just indignation of that, that I desired to see the bottom of that doctrine of the kingdom of Christ, which divers ministers then preached for a pretence for their rebellion ; which may reasonably extenuate, though not excuse the writing of it.

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