The Nation's Newsbrokers: The rush to institution, from 1865 to 1920

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Northwestern University Press, 1989 - Business & Economics - 366 pages
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Richard A. Schwarzlose's long-awaited two-volume The Nation's Newsbrokers makes a major contribution to the history of journalism in the United States. Schwarzlose traces the development of the Associated Press and the predecessors of United Press International from scattered beginnings in the 1840s to their emergence as a mature national institution in the World War I era.

Volume 2 studies the rapid growth of intercity news gathering and distribution after the Civil War, including the deterioration into collusion among newsbrokers, and changes in technology and reporting within the context of attempts to monopolize the flow of information.
 

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The nation's newsbrokers

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This completes Schwarzlose's study of journalism history. LJ 's reviewer said Vol. 1, The Formative Years, from Pre telegraph to 1865 was "essential for journalism studies'' ( LJ 3/1/89), with ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
1
Chapter
33
Chapter
63
Chapter
107
Chapter
149
Litigation and Relocation
183
Chapter
213
Notes
261
Bibliography
329
Index
353
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About the author (1989)

Richard A. Schwarzlose is Associate Professor of Journalism at the Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University.

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