The Roman Cultural Revolution

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Thomas Habinek, Alessandro Schiesaro
Cambridge University Press, Dec 4, 1997 - History - 238 pages
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This book places culture centre-stage in the investigation of the transformation of Rome from Republic to Empire. It is the first book to attempt to understand the so-called Roman Revolution as a cultural phenomenon. Instead of regarding cultural changes as dependent on political developments, the essays consider literary, artistic, and political changes as manifestations of a basic transformation of Roman culture. In Part I the international group of contributors discusses the changes in the cultural systems under the topics of authority, gender and sexuality, status and space in the city of Rome, and in Part II through specific texts and artifacts as they refract social, political, and economic changes. The essays draw on the latest methods in literary and cultural work to present a holistic approach to the Augustan Cultural Revolution.
 

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Contents

the idea of a cultural revolution
3
The invention of sexuality in the worldcity of Rome
23
Recitatio and the reorganization of the space of public
44
The boundaries of knowledge in Virgils Georgics 63
79
Horace Nasidienus and
90
Propertius newold Rome
122
gender and the play of meaning in
158
the invention of tradition in Ovid
182
whose speech?
199
Works cited
216
Index of passages cited
229
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