Songs in Many Keys

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Ticknor and Fields, 1862 - Literature, Modern - 308 pages
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Page 236 - This is the ship of pearl, which, poets feign, Sails the unshadowed main; The venturous bark that flings On the sweet summer wind its purpled wings In gulfs enchanted, where the siren sings And coral reefs lie bare, Where the cold sea-maids rise to sun their streaming Lair.
Page 174 - Little I ask ; my wants are few ; I only wish a hut of stone, (A very plain brown stone will do,) That I may call my own ; — And close at hand is such a one, In yonder street that fronts the sun. Plain food is quite enough for me; Three courses are as good as ten ; — If Nature can subsist on three, Thank Heaven for three. Amen ! I always thought cold victual nice; — My choice would be vanilla-ice. I care not much for gold or land ; — Give me a mortgage here and there, — Some good...
Page 237 - Year after year beheld the silent toil That spread his lustrous coil; Still, as the spiral grew, He left the past year's dwelling for the new, Stole with soft step its shining archway through, Built up its idle door, Stretched in his last-found home, and knew the old no more.
Page 167 - Saw the earth open and gulp her down, And Braddock's army was done so brown, Left without a scalp to its crown. It was on the terrible earthquake-day That the Deacon finished the one-hoss shay.
Page 296 - Behold its streaming rays unite, One mingling flood of braided light, — The red that fires the Southern rose, With spotless white from Northern snows, And, spangled o'er its azure, see The sister Stars of Liberty ! Then hail the banner of the free, The starry Flower of Liberty...
Page 209 - Look close — you will see not a sign of a flake! We want some new garlands for those we have shed. And these are white roses in place of the red. We've a trick, we young fellows, you may have been told, Of talking (in public) as if we were old! That boy we call "Doctor" and this we call "Judge", It's a neat little fiction — of course it's all fudge.
Page 167 - Have you heard of the wonderful one-hoss shay, That was built in such a logical way It ran a hundred years to a day, And then, of a sudden, it ah, but stay, I'll tell you what happened without delay, Scaring the parson into fits, Frightening people out of their wits, — Have you ever heard of that, I say? Seventeen hundred and fifty-five. Georgius Secundus was then alive, — Snuffy old drone from the German hive.
Page 275 - O Love Divine, that stooped to share Our sharpest pang, our bitterest tear, On Thee we cast each earthborn care, We smile at pain while Thou art near 1 Though long the weary way we tread, And sorrow crown each lingering year, No path we shun, no darkness dread, Our hearts still whispering, Thou art near...
Page 295 - Is this the Flower of Liberty ? It is the banner of the free, The starry Flower of Liberty. In savage Nature's far abode Its tender seed our fathers sowed ; The storm-winds rocked its swelling bud, Its opening leaves were streaked with blood, Till lo ! earth's tyrants shook to see The full-blown Flower of Liberty ! Then hail the banner of the free...
Page 176 - Some, not so large, in rings, A ruby, and a pearl or so. Will do for me — I laugh at show. My dame should dress in cheap attire; (Good heavy silks are never dear) ; I own perhaps I might desire Some shawls of true Cashmere, Some marrowy crapes of China silk, Like wrinkled skins on scalded milk. I would not have the horse I drive So fast that folks must stop and stare...

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