Quest for the Quantum Computer

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Simon and Schuster, Aug 14, 2001 - Computers - 396 pages
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Taking readers to the cutting edge of physics, mathematics, and computer science, Julian Brown tells the dramatic story of the groundbreaking efforts to create a fundamentally new kind of computer that would be astronomically more powerful than today's machines. In 1998, a team of researchers announced they had produced the world's first quantum computer in a cup of chloroform. In fascinating, fully accessible detail, Brown explains the ideas that led up to this accomplishment and explores the mind-stretching implications of this leap into the bizarre world of quantum physics. The Quest for the Quantum Computer is a riveting look at what promises to be one of the most important scientific and technological ideas of the twenty-first century.
 

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Minds, machines, and the multiverse: the quest for the quantum computer

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A quantum computer, unlike today's digital computers, does not process information one bit at a time but determines all possible solutions simultaneously. Although practical applications are still ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword by David Deutsch
13
God the Universe and the Reversible Computer
40
The Logic of the Quantum Conspiracy
83
Quantum Parallelism
118
Code Breaking and the Shor Algorithm
147
Privacy Lost Privacy Regained
189
How to Build a Quantum Computer
229
Quantum Error Correction and Other Algorithms
268
Crossing the Error Threshold 280 Creating the GHZ State
282
Take a Ride on the Universal Quantum Simulator
288
Visions of the Quantum Age
301
Appendix A 347 Appendix B 347 Appendix C
348
Notes
359
Bibliography
373
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A Brief History of Cryptology
J. V. Boone
No preview available - 2005
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About the author (2001)

Julian Brown is a science journalist who specializes in physics and computers. He has written extensively about quantum physics for New Scientist magazine, and is the coeditor of The Ghost in the Atom and Superstrings: A Theory of Everything? He lives in San Francisco, California.

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