Recombinant DNA

Front Cover
This updated and revised second edition acts as an introduction to the conceps and techniques of recombinant DNA research and their results. The book features 14 new chapters and 11 rewritten chapters and incorperates research published throughout 1991. The coverage of recombinant DNA centres largely on key experiments, with sections focusing on new developments in cloning, mutagenisis, and genetic engineering, plus the contribution of recombinant DNA technology to our understanding of gene function, biological processes and human genetics.
 

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Contents

Mendels Experiments with Pea Plants First
6
DNA IS THE PRIMARY GENETIC
13
The Composition of Bases of DNA from
19
Chromosomes Contain Single DNA Molecules
25
ELUCIDATION OF THE GENETIC CODE
33
Genetic Evidence Reveals That Codons
39
Increasingly Accurate Systems Are Developed
45
Bacterial Genes with Related Functions
51
Immediate Early Genes Are Third Messengers
331
ONCOGENES AND ANTIONCOGENES
335
The Transformed Phenotype Can Be Passed
341
The Bladder Carcinoma ras Oncogene
347
Oncogenes Cause Cancer in Transgenic Mice
353
The Several Steps to Colorectal Cancer
361
42
364
300
365

Restriction Enzymes Make SequenceSpecific
64
57
77
33
82
PCR Amplification Is Used For
91
34
101
cDNA Molecules Are Joined to Vector
104
35
107
Expression Vectors May Be Used to Isolate
113
Computers Have Simplified Translating
119
Cosmids Allow the Cloning of Large Segments
127
THE COMPLEXITY OF THE GENOME
137
RNA Polymerase III Transcription
143
119
150
80
154
Enhancers Can Be TissueSpecific
157
Transcription Factors Fall into Structural
163
Synthetic PremRNAs Are Spliced in Oocytes
169
36
174
Mov ABLE GENES
176
Functional Immunoglobulin Genes Are Formed
183
Transposable Elements Are Potent Tools
186
In Vitro Mutagenesis Is Used to Study Gene
192
Synthetic Oligonucleotides Facilitate
201
The PCR Can Be Used to Construct Genes
207
82
210
TRANSFERRING GENES INTO
214
37
219
Retroviruses Provide HighEfficiency Vectors
225
39
233
85
234
USING YEAST TO STUDY
235
THE INTRODUCTION OF FOREIGN
255
Knocking Out Genes by Homologous
261
ImprintingMales and Females Make
267
86
271
GENETIC ENGINEERING OF PLANTS
273
Reporter Genes Demonstrate Transgene
281
TDNA Is Used as an Insertion Mutagen
287
Processes by Using Recombinant
293
41
312
MOVING SIGNALS ACROSS
313
Growth Factor Receptors Have Intrinsic
319
Protein Phosphorylation Is a Principal
325
222
366
THE CELL CYCLE
369
The Protein Kinase Activity of the Cdc2
376
GENES THAT CONTROL
389
Neurotrophic Factors Stimulate Neuron
412
Neurotransmitter Receptors Are Members
418
Molecular Cloning and Gene Mapping Begin
428
Life May Have Originated in an RNA World
435
Exon Shuffling Contributes to Gene Evolution
441
Some Intracellular Organelles Were Once
447
88
450
Application of Recombinant
453
Monoclonal Antibodies Function as Magic
460
43
469
89
470
GENERATION OF AGRICULTURALLY
471
The Potential Use of Plants to Produce
477
MARSHALING RECOMBINANT
485
The tat Gene Regulates Synthesis of HIV
489
HIV Protease Is a Target for AIDS Drug
496
Kaposis Sarcoma Is a Tumor Associated with
504
224
506
91
507
MAPPING AND CLONING HUMAN
511
Cloned Genes and Markers Can Be Localized
517
49
528
153
564
307
565
working TowARD HUMAN GENE
567
Genetically Engineered Bone Marrow Cells
573
225
579
STUDYING WHOLE GENOMES
587
94
601
THE HUMAN GENOME INITIATIVE
605
Complete Human Disease Genes Can
612
95
614
228
619
309
620
155
621
402
625
235
626
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

James Dewey Watson James D. Watson was born on April 6, 1928. Watson was an extremely industrious student and entered the University of Chicago when he was only 15. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology four years later, and went on to earn a Ph.D. in the same subject at Indiana University. He was performing research at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, when he first learned of the biomolecular research at the Cavendish Laboratory of Cambridge University in England. Watson joined Francis Crick in this work in 1951. At the age of 25, he and colleague Crick discovered the structure of DNA, the double helix. Watson went on to become a Senior Research Fellow in Biology at the California Institute of Technology, before returning to Cambridge in 1955. The following year he moved to Harvard University, where he became Professor of Biology, a post he held until 1976. Watson and Crick won the 1962 Nobel Laureate in Medicine for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nuclear acids and its significance for information transfer in living material. In 1968, Watson published his account of the DNA discovery, "The Double Helix." The book became an international best-seller. Watson became the Director and later President of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. In 1988 he served as Director of the Human Genome Project at the National Institutes of Health, a massive project to decipher the entire genetic code of the human species. Watson has received many awards and medals for his work, along with the Nobel Prize, he has also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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