Why We Eat What We Eat: How Columbus Changed the Way the World Eats

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Simon and Schuster, Apr 5, 1993 - Cooking - 254 pages
3 Reviews
"When Christopher Columbus stumbled upon America in 1492, the Italians had no pasta with tomato sauce, the Chinese had no spicy Szechuan cuisine, and the Aztecs in Mexico were eating tacos filled with live insects instead of beef. In this lively, always surprising history of the world through a gourmet's eyes, Raymond Sokolov explains how all of us -- Europeans, Americans, Africans, and Asians -- came to eat what we eat today. He journeys with the reader to far-flung ports of the former Spanish empire in search of the points where the menus of two hemispheres merged. In the process he shows that our idea of "traditional" cuisine in contrast to today's inventive new dishes ignores the food revolution that has been going on for the last 500 years. Why We Eat What We Eat is an exploration of the astonishing changes in the world's tastes that let us partake in a delightful, and edifying, feast for the mind."--Publisher's description.
 

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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

Interesting, but not exactly compelling. The chapters on food migration between the new world and the old world dragged a bit, perhaps because most of it was not new information to me. The chapters on ... Read full review

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User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

Journalist Raymond Sokolov sets out to examine the origins of commons foods and dishes. Fascinating mix of anthropology, linguistics, genetic research, and gastronomy. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
9
PART I
19
PART IV
105
Potatoes 121 Chilies
128
PART VI
217
PART VII
239
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About the author (1993)

Raymond SokoloV was a food columnist for Natural History magazine for twenty years and is the author of several cookbooks, a much-praised novel, Native Intelligence, and a biography of New Yorker critic A. J. Liebling.

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