Mathematics for the Million

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Merlin Press, 1989 - Mathematics - 648 pages
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User Review  - iwpoe - LibraryThing

I haven't finished this book, so this review can't be considered complete, but the thing I noticed the most about the introduction is that the author subscribes to a naive and quite arrogant Whig ... Read full review

Mathematics for the million

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

First published in 1937 and reprinted several times since, Hogben's book took everybody's worst subject and explained it in a way that made it comprehensible to the average person. For this edition ... Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
9
MATHEMATICS IN REMOTE
33
I1 THE ALGEBRA OF
521
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Lancelot Hogben--a prolific British writer on topics as diverse as science, history, and politics--was born in Southsea, England, in 1895. Hogben was educated at Cambridge as a biologist, but never limited himself to a single field of inquiry. He is best remembered for his many books for adults and children that attempted to make math and science available to popular audiences. In Mathematics for a Million (1936) and Science for a Citizen (1938), Hogben offered adult readers detailed and readable texts on difficult subjects. His many books for children include First Great Inventions (1950) and Before Science Began (1970). One of Hogben's most ambitious projects emerged rather accidentally; in 1940, he and his daughter were trapped in Oslo, Norway, by the German invasion. The best plan Hogben could devise to return home to England was by making a 20,000-mile detour through Sweden, Russia, Siberia, Japan, and the United States--a journey he details in Author in Transit, a travelogue complete with commentary on politics, culture, science, and history. Hogben's academic career included stints at universities in England, Scotland, Canada, South Africa, and Guyana. He died in 1975.

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