The life of John Sterling, latter-day pamphlets

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P.F. Collier, 1901
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Page 55 - I have heard Coleridge talk, with eager musical energy, two stricken hours, his face radiant and moist, and communicate no meaning whatsoever to any individual of his hearers, — certain of whom, I for one, still kept eagerly listening in hope ; the most had long before given up, and formed (if the room were large enough) secondary humming groups of their own.
Page 56 - ... convicted flesh-and-blood absurdity, one burst of noble indignation at some injustice or depravity, rubbing elbows with us on this solid Earth, how strange would it have been in that Kantean haze-world, and how infinitely cheering amid its vacant air-castles and dim-melting ghosts and shadows ! None such ever came. His life had been an abstract thinking and dreaming, idealistic, passed amid the ghosts of defunct bodies and of unborn ones. The moaning singsong of that theosophicometaphysical monotony...
Page 54 - ... kind of mild astonishment. The whole figure and air, good and amiable otherwise, might be called flabby and irresolute; expressive of weakness under possibility of strength. He hung loosely on his limbs, with knees bent, and stooping attitude; in walking, he rather shuffled than decisively...
Page 112 - But whence ?—O Heaven, whither ? Sense knows not; Faith knows not; only that it is through Mystery to Mystery, from God and to God. ' " We are such stuff As Dreams are made of, and our little Life Is rounded with a sleep!
Page 59 - What the light of your mind, which is the direct inspiration of the Almighty, pronounces incredible, — that, in God's name, leave uncredited; at your peril do not try believing that. No subtlest hocuspocus of "reason" versus "understanding" will avail for that feat; — and it is terribly perilous to try it in these provinces!
Page 52 - COLERIDGE sat on the brow of Highgate Hill, in those years, looking down on London and its smoke-tumult, like a sage escaped from the inanity of life's battle; attracting towards him the thoughts of innumerable brave souls still engaged there.
Page 230 - I can say this with perfect truth, as I am addressing one whose person even is unknown to me, and who during my tenure of power studiously avoided every species of intercourse which could throw a suspicion upon the motives by which he was actuated.
Page 52 - The practical intellects of the world did not much heed him, or carelessly reckoned him a metaphysical dreamer: {but to the rising spirits of the young generation he had this dusky sublime character; and sat there as a kind of Magus, girt in mystery and enigma; his Dodona oak-grove (Mr. Oilman's house at Highgate) whispering strange things, uncertain whether oracles or jargon.
Page 332 - Revenge," my friends ! revenge, and the natural hatred of scoundrels, and the ineradicable tendency to revancher oneself upon them, and pay them what they have merited : this is f orevermore intrinsically a correct, and even a divine feeling in the mind of every man.
Page 251 - I have none. With regard to You and Me I cannot begin to write ; having nothing for it but to keep shut the lid of those secrets with all the iron weights that are in my power. Towards me it is still more true than towards England that no man has been and done like you. Heaven bless you ! If I can lend a hand when THERE, that will not be wanting.

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