The Law of Nations: Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns

Front Cover
T. & J. W. Johnson, 1844 - International law - 492 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

States forming a federal republic
10
He ought to know the nation
11
Each nation is bound to cultivate the friendship of others
12
A nation is under an obligation to preserve herself
16
BOOK III
18
CHAP V
22
The rights she derives from these obligations
23
Sect Page 221 Marriage 398
27
Political fundamental and civil laws
29
for the distribution of land il
33
Of the legislative power and whether it can alter the constitution 11
35
CHAP VIII
36
How an offensive war is just in an evident cause
37
How a nation acquires a perfect right to a foreign trade
40
He is intrusted with the obligations of the nation and invested
41
Monopolies and trading companies with exclusive privileges
42
Balance of trade and attention of government in that respect
43
Duty of government in that respect ib 102 Its rights in that respect
44
Duty of the nation or prince with respect to the coin ib 107 Their rights in that respect
46
of a Nation 110 A nation is bound to labour after her own happiness
47
Arts and sciences ib 114 Freedom of philosophical discussion
48
CHAP XII
54
Admission of an enemys ministers
67
Sect
70
Things belonging to the enemy
73
CHAP XIII
76
His duty to appoint upright and enlightened judges ib 164 The ordinary courts determine causes relating to the revenue
79
The prince bound to observe the forms of justice
80
foundation of the right of punishing
81
Execution of the laws
82
Right of pardoning
83
Internal police ib 175 Duel or single combat
84
Effects of the jurisdiction in foreign countries
85
Means of putting a stop to that disorder ib CHAP XIV
86
Valour
88
Other military virtues
89
Riches ib 183 Public revenues and taxes
90
CHAP XVI
92
Why a distinction is to be made between a new war and a breach
93
Right of the citizens when the nation submits to a foreign power ib 196 These compacts annulled by the failure of protection
95
CHAP XVIII
97
Possessions of certain places only or of certain rights in a
98
How a nation acquires the property of a desert country ib 208 A question on this subject 209 Whether it be lawful to take possession of part of a cou...
100
Inhabitants
101
Children born in the armies of the state or in the house of its minister at a foreign court
102
Settlement ib 219 Vagrants ib 220 Whether a person may quit his country ib 221 How a person may absent himself for a time
105
Cases in which a citizen has a right to quit his country ib 224 Emigrants
106
Sources of their right ib 226 If the sovereigo infringes their right he injures them
107
A nation cannot punish them for faults committed out of her ter ritories
109
Aggregate wealth of a nation and its divisions 236 Two modes of acquiring public property 237 The income of the public property is naturally at the...
110
Taxes
111
The nation may reserve to herself the right of imposing them ib 242 Sovereign possessing that power ib 243 Duties of the prince with respect to taxes
112
Eminent domain annexed to the sovereignty ib 245 Dominion over public property
113
Alienation of the property of a corporation ib 248 Use of common property
114
How each member is to enjoy it ib 250 Rights of anticipation in the use of it ib 251 The same right in another case ib 252 Preservation and repairs of ...
115
CHAP XXI
116
Trade with a besieged town
117
The fear of danger authorizes a refusal
123
CHAP XXIII
125
98
127
No nation ought to injure others
133
A passage may be refused for a war evidently unjust
135
How the prince is to act when the nation is resolved to change
136
A particular case in which quarter may be refused
141
Nature of that authority
142
Page
142
Abuses particularised 1 The power of the popes
146
A nation may appropriate to herself a particular branch of trade
147
CHAP IV
153
Sect Page 152 Whether prisoners of war may be made slaves 356
154
Whether an enemy may tawfully be assassinated or poisoned 358
157
Offices of humanity in these mattersmissionaries
159
Treaties cannot be made contrary to those already existing
165
The more ancient ally entitled to a preference
167
CHAP VIII
168
Obligation to preserve equality in treaties
173
CHAP IX
177
How inequality of treaties and alliances may be conformable
180
CHAP X
183
Treaties concluded by kings or other monarchs
186
Treaties accomplished once for all and perfected
192
Obligation of a real alliance when the allied king is deposed
212
Of the Dissolution and Renewal of Treaties Sect Puge 198 Expiration of alliances made for a limited time
213
Renewal of treaties ib 200 How a treaty is dissolved when violated by one of the contract ing parties
214
The violation of one treaty does not cancel another ib 202 The violation of one article in a treaty may cancel the whole
215
The treaty is roid by the destruction of one of the contracting powers
216
Treaties dissolved by mutual consent
217
CHAP XIV
218
Regulations established by treaty or custom respecting postlimi nium
222
CHAP XV
223
Subjects cannot commit hostilities without the sovereigns order 399
224
Private contracts of the sovereign
225
Why the law of nations should have adopted this rule
226
Supplicants
227
CHAP XV
228
Obscure expressions interpreted by others more clear in the same author
254
Interpretation founded on the connection of the discourse ib 286 Interpretation drawn from the connection and relation of the things themselves
255
Interpretation founded on the reason of the deed
256
He cannot alienate the public property
260
The nation may give her a right to do it
261
Rules on that subject with respect to treaties between nation and nation
262
First general maximit is not allowable to interpret what has ha need of interpretation
263
Second general maximif he who could and ought to have ex plained himself has not done it it is to his own detriment 245
264
Third general maximNeither of the contracting parties has a right to interpret the treaty according to his own fancy
265
Fourth general maximwhat is sufficiently declared is to be taken for true
266
We ought to attend rather to the words of the person promis ing than to those of the party stipulating
267
Fifth general maximthe interpretation ought to be made accord ing to certain rules 246
268
How we ought to interpret deeds of pure liberality
270
Collision of laws or treaties
271
or who are in offensive alliance with
274
Shores and ports
290
of Warits different kinds and the Right of making War Secl Page 1 Definition of War
291
It belongs only to the sovereign power
292
Defensive and offensive war
293
CHAP III
301
Disposition to be entertained towards an enemy
302
Both justificatory reasons and proper motives requisite in under taking a war
303
in a doubtful cause
306
Sometimes reputed lawful ib 41 War undertaken to punish a nation
307
Alone and of itself it cannot give a right to attack him
308
How the appearances of danger give that right
309
Another case more evident
310
Other allowable means of defence against a formidable power
311
ib 48 Ways of maintaining it
312
Second rule
313
CHAP IV
314
Other reasons for the necessity of its publication ib 57 Defensive war requires no declaration
317
Commencement of hostilities
318
Eighth rule
319
What is lawful war in due forın ib 67 It is to be distinguished from informal and unlawful war
320
In what case it does not produce the same effect
323
How nations may abandon their rights and just complaints
325
Distinction to be made between evident and doubtſul cases
331
BOOK II
333
Possessors right in doubtful cases
337
What is required to render them lawful
343
OF A NATION CONSIDERED IN HER RELATION TO OTHER STATES
344
Fugitives and deserters
346
Those who have given cause for reprisals are bound to indemni
349
The right of making prisoners of
352
CHAP IX
362
What is withheld from him in order to oblige him to give just satisfaction O
365
Waste and destruction ib 167 Ravaging and burning
366
CHAP X
371
Spies
376
Whether the offers of a traitor may be accepted
377
ib CHAP XI
378
Nations not rigidly to enforce the law of nature against each other
381
CHAP XIII
384
Offices of humanity and their foundation
385
Acquisition of moveable property ib 197 Acquisition of immoveablesor conquests
386
How to transfer them validly
387
Lands of private persons
388
Conquest of the whole state ib 202 To whom the conquest belongs
389
CHAP XIV
392
Whether it takes effect among the allies ib 208 Of no validity in neutral nations ib 209 What things are recoverable by that right 394 210 Of those w...
395
Right of postliminium for what is restored at the peace
397
the sovereigns will
398
Privateers ib 230 Volunteers
401
What soldiers and subalterns may do ib 232 Whether the state is bound to indemnify the subjects for damages sustained in war
402
CHAP XVI
403
Violation of the truce
406
Stipulation of a penalty against the infractor ib 244 Time of the truce
407
what is allowed or not during its continu ance First ruleEach party may do at home what they have a right to do in time of peace
408
Second ruleNot to take advantage of the truce in doing what hostilities would have prevented
409
or introducing succours ib 249 Distinction of a particular case
410
Retreat of an army during a suspension of hostilities ib 251 Third ruleNothing to be attempted in contested places but every thing to be left as it was
411
much less to be solicited to treason ib 255 Persons or effects of enemies not to be seized during the truce
413
CHAP XVII
415
Nature of safe conducts and passports
416
Extent of the promised security ib 269 How to judge of the right derived from a safe conduct
417
Whether it includes baggage and domestics ib 272 Safe conduct given in general to any one and his retinue ib 271 Safe conduct granted to the father...
418
A person unavoidably detained beyond the term ib 275 The safeconduct does not expire at the death of him who gave it ib 276 How it may be revok...
419
CHAP XVIII
420
Popular coinmotion insurrection sedition ib 290 How the sovereign is to suppress them ib 291 He is bound to perform the promises he has made to t...
424
A civil war produces two independent parties
425
They are to observe the common laws of war O ib 295 The effects of civil war distinguished according to cases
426
Conduct to be pursued by foreign nations
427
of Peace and the Obligation to cultivate
429
A state ought to retain her rank notwithstanding any changes
432
Alienation of a part of the state 118
433
Amnesty
438
Causes of rupture on account of allies
443
Whether a distinction may here be made between the more
451
Duties of a nation for the preservation of others
453
Resident ministers
457
Origin of the several orders of public ministers
459
successors
464
How he may be punished for ordinary transgressions
474
Agreement of nations concerning the privileges of ambassadors 482

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information