The History of British India, Volume 1

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J. Madden, 1858 - Hindus
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Page 132 - Brahman springs to light, he is born above the world, the chief of all creatures, assigned to guard the treasury of duties, religious and 1 " Institutes,
Page 343 - He, whom the mind alone can perceive, whose essence eludes the external organs, who has no visible parts, who exists from eternity, even he, the soul of all beings, whom no being can comprehend, shone forth in person.
Page 17 - Elizabeth under the name of the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies.
Page 87 - The increase of our revenue is the subject of our care, as much as our trade : — 'tis that must maintain our force, when twenty accidents may interrupt our trade;' 'tis that must make us a nation in India...
Page 218 - Under this simple form of municipal government, the inhabitants of the country have lived from time immemorial. The boundaries of the villages have been but seldom altered ; and though the villages themselves have been sometimes injured and even desolated by war, famine and disease, the same name, the same limits, the same interests and even the same families, have continued for ages. The inhabitants...
Page 217 - A village, geographically considered, is a tract of country comprising some hundred or thousand acres of arable and waste lands: politically viewed it resembles a corporation or township.
Page 269 - We must not be surprised," he says, " at finding, on a close examination, that the characters of all the Pagan deities, male and female, melt into each other and at last into one or two; for it seems a well-founded opinion, that the whole crowd of gods and goddesses in ancient Rome, and modern Varanes [Benares] mean only the powers of nature, and principally those of the Sun, expressed in a variety of ways and by a multitude of fanciful names.
Page 91 - England, which were a heap of nonsense, compiled by a few ignorant country gentlemen, who hardly knew how to make laws for the good government of their own private families, much less for the regulating of companies and foreign commerce.
Page 284 - Let him slide backwards and forwards on the ground ; or let him stand a whole day on tiptoe ; or let him continue in motion rising and sitting alternately : but at sunrise, at noon, and at sunset, let him go to the waters and bathe. In the hot season, let him sit exposed to five fires ; four blazing around him, with the sun above : in the rains, let him stand uncovered, without even a mantle, and where the clouds pour the heaviest showers ; in the cold season, let him wear humid vesture ; and let...
Page 309 - Let him chuse for his wife a girl, whose form has no defect ; who has an agreeable name ; who walks gracefully like a phenicopteros, or like a young elephant ; whose hair and teeth are moderate respectively in quantity and in size ; whose body has exquisite softness.

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