The Present State of Portugal, and of the Portuguese Army: With an Epitome of the Ancient History of that Kingdom ...

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G. R. Clarke, 1812 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814 - 439 pages
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Page 417 - Delancy, who was killed by a cannon shot in the middle of the action. This officer is a serious loss to his Majesty's service, and to me at this moment.
Page 363 - ... hussars on their right. They retired, and took post behind a wall, from which post they again repulsed the enemy, and advanced a second time in pursuit of them, and took from them a howitzer. They were, however, again attacked by a fresh column, with cavalry, and retired again to their post, where they were joined by the other brigade of the Light division, consisting of the two battalions of the 52d, and the 1st caqadores.
Page 341 - This movement has afforded me a favourable opportunity of shewing the enemy, the description of troops of which this army is composed; it has brought the Portuguese levies into action with the enemy for the first time in an advantageous situation; and they have proved that the trouble which has been taken with them, has not been thrown away, and that they are worthy of contending in the same ranks with British troops, in this interesting cause, which they afford the best hopes of saving.
Page 400 - ... from the opposite side, that the breach was there ; and, moving in that direction, I dropped myself from the ravelin, and landed in the ditch, opposite to the foot of the breach, where I found the head of the storming party just beginning to fight their way into it. The combat was of short duration ; and, in less than half an hour from the commencement of the attack, the place was in our possession. After carrying the breach, we met with no further opposition, and moved round the ramparts to...
Page 364 - Dunlop's column crossed the bridge of the Coa, and ascended the heights on the right flank of the enemy, and the cavalry appeared on the high ground in rear of the enemy's left...
Page 432 - Castile, your awful dread — yet, conscious, say, When Diniz reign'd, when his bold son bore sway, By whom were trodden down the bravest bands That ever march'd from proud Castilia's lands ? 'Twas your brave sires — and has one languid reign Fix'd in your tainted souls so deep a stain, That now, degen'rate from...
Page 260 - IBI2, founded and supported upon such principles, it ' need scarcely be added, that humanity, good order, and medical science, were equally forgotten and neglected. No one attempted to enforce even the shadow of discipline, and the picture which many of the general hospitals exhibited may be conceived, but cannot possibly be described. They were infinitely more destructive to the army than the sword of the enemy, and they would have destroyed it much faster than it could have been recruited, had...
Page 433 - But ev'ry land your dauntless rage should own. Still, if your hands, benumb'd by female fear, Shun the bold war, hark ! on my sword I swear, Myself alone the dreadful war shall wage, Mine be the fight" — and, trembling with the rage Of...
Page 146 - Ackland's brigade in its advance to its position on the heights on the left, and a cannonade was kept up on the flank of the enemy's columns by the artillery on those heights. At length, after a most desperate contest, the enemy was driven back in confusion from this attack with the loss of seven pieces of cannon, many prisoners, and a great number of officers and soldiers killed and wounded. He was pursued by...
Page 432 - ... war, Was own'd, where'er approach'd her thund'ring car ; Shall now her sons their faith, their love deny, And, while their country sinks, ignobly fly ; Ye tim'rous herd, are ye the genuine line Of those illustrious shades, whose rage divine, Beneath great Henry's standards aw'd the foe, For whom ye tremble and would stoop so low ! That foe, who, boastful now, then basely fled, When your undaunted sires the hero led, When seven bold earls, in chains, the spoil adorn'd, And proud Castile through...

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