The Cambridge Modern History, Volume 2

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1904 - History, Modern
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTER IV
104
At the University of Erfurt
110
Luthers ordination Transfer to Wittenberg 1508
116
The practice of Indulgences
122
Remission of guilt Luthers position
128
Mission of Miltitz to Germany Interview with Luther
134
Luther at the Diet
140
NATIONAL OPPOSITION TO ROME IN GERMANY
142
The state of popular feeling in Germany
148
The knights and Sickingen
154
Spread of the Reformed doctrines
160
The Anabaptists
166
Demand for a General Council Catholic Princes at Ratisbon 1524
172
CHAPTER VII
206
The Tetrapolitana Position of Charles between the parties
212
Charles conciliates the Protestants Turkish invasion repelled
218
Revolutionary movements
222
Social ferment in North Germany The Hanse League
228
Wittenberg Concord 1536 Divisions among the Protestants
234
Conference of Ratisbon 1541 Its failure
240
CHAPTER VIII
246
Maurice of Saxony and John Frederick
252
Breakup of the Protestant army Negotiations with the South German
258
Relations of Clement and Charles V Treaty of Barcelona 1529 Con
266
CHAPTER IX
280
The Placards at Paris 1534 Persecutions Milder policy Proposed
286
La Chambre Ardente Organisation of French Protestantism
293
Death of Francis II 1560 Accession of Charles IX Catharine
299
CHAPTER X
305
Zwinglis ideas His influence and position at Zurich
311
The first public Disputation at Zurich 1523
317
The Swiss Anabaptists
323
The Christian Civic League and the Christian Union
329
Relations with Germany The Tetrapolitana
335
Division of the Swiss Confederation
341
CHAPTER XI
342
CHAPTER XII
377
Processes for heresy in the Veneto Court of Renée at Ferrara
386
Pietro Martire Vermigli at Lucca
393
Fate of the Catholic reformers Reform of the Church in Spain
401
The Inquisition and the Reformers at Seville
408
CHAPTER XIII
416
Revolt and reconquest of Siena 15525
545
CHAPTER XVI
550
Murder of Beton Battle of Pinkie 1547
556
Elizabeth and her relations to foreign Powers
561
Act of Supremacy
567
Elizabeth and the Scottish Protestants
573
The papal Nuncio The Scottish Reformation Parliament
579
Elizabeths Second Parliament The Oath of Supremacy
585
Charles abdication Accession of Pope Paul IV His character
586
The Churches of England and Scotlan
591
Elizabeth and the Calvinists Zurich Bullinger
597
Abuses in the Church I Denmark Accession of Christian II
602
NOTE ON THE REFORMATION IN POLAND
634
Different parties among the Catholic reformers
640
Commission of Cardinals 1537 Their recommendations
643
Split of the Catholic reformers The Inquisition
649
Relations of the Jesuits to successive Popes
655
Failure of Contarini and his associates
661
Seripando The Jesuits at the Council
667
Pope Paul IV 1555 His secular and religious policy
673
The Sacrament of Orders The rights of Bishops
680
Acceptance and execution of the decrees
686
CHAPTER XIX
690
Occasion of the Epistolae obscurorum virorum
696
The Platonic Academy The new Aristotelians
702
The life and death of Giordano
708
Luther Jakob Boehme
714
chaps pAges
719
Luther 728733
728
The Reformation in France 765768
765
Calvin 779783
779
Henry VIII 789794
789
The Reformation under Edward VI 795801
795
Philip and Mary 802805
802
The Scandinavian North 814817
814
Tendencies of European Thought in the Age XIX
825
League with France War with Philip II 1556
833
INDEX 835857
835
Capture of Calais Battle of Gravelines 1558 Treaty of Cateau
839
Resulting settlement of Europe
845
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 709 - The caricature of his filth and zanyism proves how fully he both knew and felt the danger in which he stood. I could write a treatise in proof and praise of the morality and moral elevation of Rabelais...
Page 569 - Highness is the only supreme governor of this realm ... as well in all spiritual or ecclesiastical things or causes as temporal...
Page 855 - History in the University of Cambridge. Edited by AW WARD, Litt.D GW PROTHERO, Litt.D., and STANLEY LEATHES, MA To be complete in twelve volumes. Royal 8vo.
Page 856 - It is the one work now within reach of the young American student of to-day in which he may learn the connected story of the great battle that resulted in the overthrow of slavery and the rededication of the republic to unsullied freedom. In no other publication are these facts so concisely, so fully, and so well presented...
Page 32 - Viterbo, revealed the disease, when it pointed to the misuse of papal power as the cause of all the harm, and demanded a limitation to the absolutism of the Head of the Church. This tallied with the Pope's ideas, and the celebrated instruction issued to the Nuncio Chieregato (1522), which announced that the disease had come from the head to the members, from the Pope to the prelates, and confessed, " We have all sinned, and there is not one that doeth good.
Page 596 - God, is the only supreme governor of this realm, and of all other his Highness's dominions and countries, as well in all spiritual or ecclesiastical things or causes as temporal; and that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state or potentate hath, or ought to have, any jurisdiction, power, superiority, pre-eminence or authority, ecclesiastical or spiritual, within his Majesty's said realms, dominions and countries.
Page 130 - The Christian who has true repentance has already received pardon from God altogether apart from an Indulgence and does not need it; and Christ demands this true repentance from everyone.
Page 503 - ... to good and godly uses, as in erecting of grammar schools to the education of youth in virtue and godliness, the further augmenting of the Universities, and better provision for the poor and needy...
Page 722 - La diplomatie française vers le milieu du xvi* siècle, d'après la correspondance de Guillaume Pellicier, évêque de Montpellier, ambassadeur de François I
Page 352 - ... purpose, and the ethical ideas of Seneca; but the passion for religion- has not as yet penetrated as it did later into his very bones. Erasmus is in Calvin's eyes the ornament of letters, though his large edition of Seneca is not all it ought to have been ; but even Erasmus could not at twenty-three have produced a work so finished in its scholarship, so real in its learning, or so wide in its outlook.

Bibliographic information