A Century of Recorded Music: Listening to Musical History

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Yale University Press, 2002 - Music - 306 pages
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An exploration of the impact of recording technology on the art of music. Timothy Day chronicles the developments in recording technology since its inception and describes the powerful effects it has had on artistic performance, audience participation, and listening habits. He also offers a comparison of the characteristics of musical life a century ago with those of today.
 

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A century of recorded music: listening to musical history

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Day, curator of Western art music at the Sound Archive of the British Library in London, is unquestionably an authority on recorded music, and he writes with an anecdotal ease that is engaging and ... Read full review

Contents

Making Recordings
1
The Repertory Recorded
58
Changes in Performing Styles Recorded
142
Listening to Recordings
199
Bibliographical Note
257
A Note on the Recordings
260
Notes
262
Index
289
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About the author (2002)

Day is curator of Western art music at the Sound Archive of the British Library, London, one of the largest collections of recorded sound in the world.

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