The Earth and Its Inhabitants, Africa: North-west Africa

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1887 - Africa
 

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Contents

Regions South of Barka lying below the Level of the Mediterranean
24
The Kufra Oasis
30
Kufra Oasis
33
The Great Syrtis and Tripolitana Searoard
34
Routes of the Chief Explorers in Tripoli tana
35
Projected Railways across West Africa
37
The KasrelJebel Cirque To face page
40
Oases and Arable Lands of Tripolitana
47
Inhabitants of Tripolitana
49
Jofra Oasis t
57
The Kin mi Coast District Tripolitana
61
Tripoli from the Roadstead
64
Fezzan
68
Routes of the Chief Explorers in Fezzan
70
Oases of Fezzan
73
Murzuk
80
Ghadames
82
Ghadames District
83
The Ghadames Oasis
85
General View of Ghadames
86
Rhat
90
Rhat
91
Ancient form of Mauritania according to Bourguignats Hypothesis
96
Tararxa IslandView taken from the Coast
103
HamadaelKessera
104
Tne Jerel Zaghwan
105
Lakes of Eskel and Bizerta
107
Gorges of the Middle Mejerda
108
Old Beds of the Lower Mejerda
109
SillofCabes
114
Zone of the Shotts south of East Algeria and Tunis
115
Tracks of Travellers in the ShottelJerid
116
Island of Jerba
119
Cape Bon and Zembra Island
124
Native Inhabitants of Tunis
134
Tunisian Jewess
137
Houses at Kasr ElMudenin
140
Jerra Island Castle near Humt Suk
142
View taken from tho Jara Gardens
144
Peninsula of Nefzawa
146
Jerid
147
from the Ruined Side 46 Mahdiya
153
Monastir and Sua 48 Kairwan
156
Kasrah of Susa viewed from the French Consulate
158
General View of Kairwan
160
Susa and Enfida
164
Aqueducts of Carthage 54 Tunis
167
La Goletta
175
Carthage
176
Ancient Ports of Carthage 58 Plain of Ghardimau
181
Ruins of Utica
184
Bizerta viewed from the Kasrah 61 Tabarka
185
CorkTree of Fernana 63 Railways and Highways of Tunis
192
Aloeria
197
Gradual Conquest of Algeria
200
Erosions of the Mountains near Tiaret 66 Junction of the Geodetic Lines between Algeria and Spain
205
Ancient Glaciers of the Haizer Mountains 68 Gorges of the Wed Agriun 69 View taken in the SharetelAkra Route 70 Cape de
210
Lakes of La Calle
214
Valley of the Wed Mita retween the Garaa ElOnkser and the Garaa TelBeida
217
Shott Melghigh and Projected Inland Sea 75 Artesian Wells of Ziban and the Wed Righ 76 Barrage of the Hamiz 77 Rainfall of the Sahara in 1884
222
Forests of Algeria 79 The Alfa Region
225
Chief Ancient Cities of Algeria
230
Kabyle Family Group
232
Nomad Encampment
236
Aoha of Tuourt 84 SukAhras and its Environs
238
La Calle
239
General View of Bona
242
Bona
243
Edugh and Lake Fetzara
244
Constantine in 1836
246
The Natural Arch op Constantine
247
General View of Constantine taken from
248
Philippeville
250
Jijili
251
Zwawa and AitIraten Territory
257
Chief Tribes of Kabylia
261
Fort National
264
Dellys
265
Palestro and Gorges of the I user
266
Lower Sebau and Isser Valleys
267
Algiers in 1830
269
Algiers in 1885
270
Gorges of the Shelif
282
Medea
283
Miliana Sill of Affreville
284
Mostaganem
285
Arzeu
287
Oran
288
Plain of the Andalusians
290
Tlemcen
291
Street View in Tlemcen
292
Mouth of the Tafna
293
Nemours
294
Nemours
295
The Sheliya and Plain of Medina
297
Ruins of the Prjetorium
298
Fum Esantina
299
Ancient Roman Towns in North Aures
300
A Nail Arab Woman
301
The BuKhail Mountains
302
Emancipated Negress Biskra
304
Oases of the Northern and Southern Zibans
305
The Wed Righ Oasis
306
Tugurt
307
Laghwat
308
CHaP PAOE
310
Mzab
311
General View op Ghardaya
312
Mzab and Metlili
313
pIO PaGI 140 Wargla
315
ElGolea
317
The AinSefra Highlands
318
Growth of the European Population in Algeria since 1830
320
TenietelHaad and its Forests
322
A Great Algerian Domain
326
Thermal Springs
327
Growth of the Foreign Trade of Algeria since 1830
329
Linesof Steam Navigation between Mauri tania and the Opposite Coast
330
Roads and Railways of Algeria
331
An Arar Family op Tlemcen
334
Fully Privileged Mixed and Native Communes in Algeria
335
Relative Population of the Algerian Com munes
337
Holy Cities and Chief Religious Associa
338
tions in Algeria
341
Algiers in 1832
342
Tiaret and Tagdemt
343
Routes of the Chief Explorers in Marooco
346
BledelMakhzen and BledesSiba
347
158
349
160
354
The Sherat River
356
Lower Course of the Sebu
357
163
358
164
364
Arar Woman of Tangier
365
Arar CamelDriver
368
167
371
Tetuan
373
Ceuta
374
Tangier
376
ElAraish and Chemmish
378
Fez and Neighbourhood
379
173
380
Mecnes and Volubilis
382
175
384
Rrat and Mouth of the BuRegrao View taken from Sla
386
177
387
Mazagan and Azemmur
389
MaroocoThe Christians Gate
391
Marrakesh
392
181
394
Tarudant
396
Ifni and Neighbouring Coast
399
184
403
186
406
187
409
188
410
The Sahara
414
199
454
Western Sahara
471
203
472
206
498
214
499
219 220 222 224 226 230 232 233 235 238 239
502

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Page 468 - The only remarkable monument in the place is the "Tower," pre-eminently so-called, about 95 feet high, and serving the double purpose of a minaret and a watch-tower. The shaft bulges out towards the centre, like the trunk of a deleb palm-tree, and gradually tapers towards the summit, where it is not more than about 8 feet in width. Like most of the houses in Agades, it is built entirely of clay, and in order to strengthen a building so lofty and of so soft a material, its four walls are united by...
Page 117 - Routes," on account of the roads which traverse it. Some of these tracks are perfectly free from danger, whilst others must be crossed with the utmost caution, owing to the fissures, in which the wayfarer might suddenly disappear. On commencing the transit, the guide always admonishes the travellers to follow carefully in his footsteps, so as to avoid this danger. The sebkha of Tunis is much more inclined than the Runn of British India, presenting a slope of from 30 to 36 feet from cast to west,...
Page 253 - Soldo; of the Romans, is a decayed place, although since the middle of the century it has recovered most of its former population. It was twice a royal capital, first under the Vandals before the capture of Carthage, and again under the...
Page 436 - ... naturally comes from the desert. No region of the Sahara contains larger deposits of excellent salt than the Bilma district, which accordingly attracts buyers from far and wide. In order to welcome the strangers, the native women receive them by throwing handfuls of salt over their clothes, as if to say, " The best of the land for you ! " According to Nachtigal, seventy thousand camels come every year for their load of salt at the Bilma salines, and some of the salt caravans, such as those of...

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