The Race to the White Continent: Voyages to the Antarctic

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2002 - History - 320 pages
In the 1830s, the forbidding Antarctic region represented the ultimate mystery. The prospect of discovering a lucrative whaling ground made this uncharted and untapped region especially enticing. Three expeditions to the pole were launched simultaneously by the United States, France, and Britain, each vying to be the first to venture farther south than any vessel had ever sailed before. These expeditions paved the way for the explorers, traders, and whalers of what was to become known as the "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration. The Race to the White Continent is a captivating account of their adventures.
 

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The race to the white continent

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Many sailing voyages preceded the great expeditions to Antarctica at the beginning of the 20th century. Gurney (Below the Convergence: Voyages to Antartica, 1699-1839) recounts many of them in this ... Read full review

Contents

The Background
9
Blubber Hunters and Traders
12
The Sea SurveyorsFrench
35
The Sea SurveyorsBritish
59
Terra Australis
73
Holes at the Poles
93
Infinite Confusion
107
Wilkes Takes Charge
118
The Everlasting Expedition
165
Haunted by Cook
183
The Magnetic Crusade
205
To the Pillars of the Gateway
223
The Pilgrims of the Ocean
243
Perplexing Navigation
257
Antarctic Aftermath
270
Bibliography
297

Hurrah for the Exploring Expedition
130
South Pacific Prelude
148

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About the author (2002)

Alan Gurney is a former yacht designer and photographer living in Suffolk, England. His previous books include Compass and Race to the White Continent.

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