(vol. I-II) Revolutionary and subversive movements abroad and at home

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J. B. Lyon, 1920 - Americanization
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Contents

State Legislation Patriotic Measures 3413
14
State Legislation English Language 3414
15
St Francis Xavier 331617
17
Illiteracy in California 3415
21
Suggestions for Speakers on Americanization 342125
25
n St Stephens College 3317
28
Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society of America 31993202
29
Irish Emigrant Society 3229
32
State Normal Schools 256468
33
Organization of Americanization Work for California 3433
34
European Conditions and Historical Review
37
Jewish Welfare Board 323438
38
ployment Age 391748
39
Knights of Columbus 3238
40
Note on Chapter XIV Kansas 1 Kansas City 434445
45
Citizenship Training Through Industries 3435
49
Settlement Houses 29493017
50
Letter from State Commission of Immigration and Housing 344051
51
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 345253
53
State Legislation Flags 345455
55
State Legislation English Language 3455
57
State Legislation Minors of Employment Age 345859
59
Population Figures 3459
62
Letter from Assistant Superintendent of Public Education 3761
63
Americanization Work in Rural Communities 346264
64
Americanization Work for Religious Bodies and Through Paro chial Schools 346466
66
Americanization in Industry 346667
67
National Security League 324968
68
New York Community Chorus 326880
72
ployment Age 367273
73
New York State Federation of Labor 3273
74
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America Amalgamated Textile
75
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors of Employment Age 367376
76
State Legislation Flag 3676
77
Employers Views of Industrial Relations Welfare Work Profit
79
Manufacturers Association of Connecticut 346880
80
Citizenship Training Through Public Schools 3677
81
Polish National Alliance 3279
82
Note on Chapter XXXI North Dakota 4382
83
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 348386
86
Socialism and Labor in Germany 8790
87
State Legislation English Language 3486
88
American Civil Liberties Union 197989
89
Citizenship Training in Columbus 39894016
90
Letter to School Superintendents 3690
93
State Policy on Americanization 34883522
94
b Survey of the Field 349496
96
CHAPTER IV
99
CHAPTER V
114
Socialism and Labor in Holland
116
Introduction 201316
122
Swedish Party Correspondence 12632
133
Socialism and Labor in the Balkans 14344
143
The Third Socialist International from Its Origin
413
Socialism in Mexico Central and South America 49497
494
SECTION II
501
Census of Aliens 34903501
502
Constructive Measures
503
Principal Cities of the State Outside of New York City 25692622
551
North Carolina
562
Socialist Party of America 51063
563
Recobd of Constbuctive Activities in Immigrant Education and Citizen
583
xviii
607
CHAPTER III
627
State Legislation Minors of Employment Age 362428
631
Agitation and Speeches 143139
671
The Left Wing Movement in the Socialist Party of America 676706
676
Amsterdam 2570
681
SECTION m
762
Communist Labor Party 799817
799
Investigation into Radical Activities in Upper Part of State 2838
828
Elmira 2582
832
Genera 2584
834
Nion 25S5 18 Ithaca 2586
838
Anarchist Movement In America
839
AnarchoSyndicalism 86169
861
SUBSECTION III
865
Bevolutionary Industrial Unionism
871
The Industrial Workers of the World 883906
883
Workers International Industrial Union 90715
907
CHAPTER III
916
Americanization Work in Progress 2293
950
The International Ladies Garment Workers Union 96859
959
Spread of Soclaliun In Educated Circlet Through Paolnst Bellgiotu Oollatiate
967
SUBSECTION
969
National Peace Federation September 1915 December 4 1915 98187
981
The Ford Peace Party 98892
992
American Neutral Conference Committee 99397
993
Lockport 2588
994
Note on Chapter XXXVII South Carolina 4418
1003
Citizenship Training in all States Other than New York
1013
CHAPTER VI
1024
Organized Labor and Education 216673
1042
Peoples Council of America June 1917 to April 1920 105178
1051
Note on diaper I Alabama 4278
1058
Development of American League to Limit Armaments December
1077
Note on Chapter XLIII Virginia
1089
Peoples Freedom Union 110511
1105
Academic and Scholastic Socialist Activities 111221
1112
General Introduction 152530
1113
Mount Vernon 2590
1119
Rochester 2597
1120
Socialism and the Churches 112240
1122
State Programs 24302563
1130
Tonawanda i 2616
1131

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Page 60 - The bourgeoisie, during its rule of scarce one hundred years, has created more massive and more colossal productive forces than have all preceding generations together.
Page 919 - The working class and the employing class have nothing in common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people and the few, who make up the employing class, have all the good things of life.
Page 58 - The bourgeoisie, wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his "natural superiors,*' and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous "cash payment...
Page 558 - Workers of the world, unite: you have nothing to lose but your chains, and a new world to win.
Page 1146 - Refrain from these men and let them alone : for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to naught; but if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it, lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 49 - That proposition is: that in every historical epoch, the prevailing mode of economic production and exchange, and the social organization necessarily following from it, form the basis upon which is built up, and from which alone can be explained, the political and intellectual history of that epoch...
Page 64 - Unions) against the bourgeois; they club together in order to keep up the rate of wages; they found permanent associations in order to make provision beforehand for these occasional revolts. Here and there the contest breaks out into riots. Now and then the workers are victorious, but only for a time. The real fruit of their battles lies, not in the immediate result, but in the ever - expanding union of the workers.
Page 66 - ... their existence as fractions of the middle class. They are therefore not revolutionary, but conservative. Nay, more; they are reactionary, for they try to roll back the wheel of history. If by chance they are revolutionary, they are so only in view of their impending transfer into the proletariat; they thus defend not their present, but their future interests; they desert their own standpoint to place themselves at that of the proletariat. The "dangerous class...
Page 58 - ... railways extended, in the same proportion the bourgeoisie developed, increased its capital, and pushed into the background every class handed down from the Middle Ages. We see, therefore, how the modern bourgeoisie is itself the product of a long course of development, of a series of revolutions in the modes of production and of exchange.
Page 61 - For many a decade past, the history of industry and commerce is but the history of the revolt of modern productive forces against modern conditions of production, against the property relations that are the conditions for the existence of the bourgeoisie and of its rule.