Popular Music and Film

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Ian Inglis
Wallflower Press, 2003 - Performing Arts - 205 pages
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The growing presence of popular music in film is one of the most exciting areas of contemporary research in film studies. The changing roles and functions that such music performs, the variety of ways in which it provides narrative, aesthetic and commercial opportunities, and the consequences of its increasing displacement of the traditional film score are among the most significant developments in recent cinema practice. Written by an international group of academics and researchers, the new essays in this volume seek to explore these issues and to locate them within their appropriate creative and organizational contexts. Individually, the chapter-by-chapter focus on specific topics allows for close examination of particular debates; collectively, the book's overall analysis points to important changes in the production and consumption of both film and music.

 

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Contents

Art Commerce and the H Factor in Film and
8
Music and the Body in Dance Film
22
The Sting in the Tale
39
The Day Jimi Hendrix Burned his
60
Telling the Tale of
77
The Sound of a New Film Form
91
Sliding Doors and Topless Women Talk About Their Lives
102
Ridiculous Infantile Acrobatics or Why They Never Made Any
117
The Software
131
The Curious Case of the Missing Soundtrack
148
The Big Chill
162
Bibliography
194
Index
202
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About the author (2003)

Ian Inglis is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Northumbria

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