The Rhetorical Manual, Or, Southern Fifth Reader: Embracing Copious and Elegant Extracts Both in Prose and Poetry : with a Treatise on Rhetorical Figures, and the Principles of Elocution

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J.B. Steel, 1854 - Elocution - 549 pages
 

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Contents

Ode to the Passions
85
The Folly of Drunkenness
88
Columbus before the Council at Salamanca W Irving
95
Columbus first discovers Land in the New World W Irving
101
First Landing of Columbus in New World W Irving
104
Ambition Willis
106
Adams Morning Hymn Milton
107
Sabbath Evening G D Prentice
109
Moral and Literary Studies Bishop Potter
110
Books Channing
112
The Speech of Brutus on the Death of CEesar Shakspeare
114
Antonys Funeral Oration over Caesars Body Shakspeare
115
The Bashful Man
118
The Same continued
121
Battle of New Orleans Anonymous
124
The Miseries of War Anonymous
127
The Historians Reflections Slake
130
17 The Common Lot Montgomery
132
The Times of Old Young
133
Subjects of Conversation W Chambers
136
The Roman Soldier Atherstone
139
The Folly of Inconsistent Expectations Mrs Barbauld
143
The Three Warnings Mrs Thrale
146
On Study Bacon
149
Ararat a Sacred Mountain J T Headley
150
The Same continued
153
The Spirit of Poetry J G Percival
156
Bunker Hill Monument Webster
159
The Puritans Macaulay
161
Elegy written in a Country Churchyard Gray
164
Moral Greatness and Beauty superior to that which is material Akenside
169
Westminster Abbey W Irving
170
Christmas W Irving
182
Cato on the Immortality of the Soul Addison
185
Speech in the House of Peers c Chatham
186
Pauls Defence before Agrippa New Testament
189
Speech on the Virginia Resolutions 1775 Patrick Henry
191
The Battle of Prague Campbell
195
Conclusion of an Address on the Occasion of laying the Corner Stone of the Na tional Monument to Washington Winthrop
197
The Poetry of Nature Jos G Percival
199
Discovery of the Pacific Ocean IK Irving
200
Vasco Nunez on the Shores of the South Sea W Irving
203
Execution of Vasco Nunez W Irving
204
Juba and Syphax Addison
207
A Search alter Happiness Joseph C Neal
211
The Same continued
216
FitzJames and Roderick Dhu Scott
220
The Same continued
223
Washington Phillips
227
Goody Blake and Harry Gill Wordsworth
232
Prevailing Errors in Regard to the Nature and End of Education Bishop Potter
233
Soliloquy of the Old Philosopher Jane Taylor
236
Soliloquy of the Young Lady Jane Taylor
239
Choice of Hercules Taller
240
Silence and Meditation Martineau
242
Byron the Poet and the Man Pollok
246
The Human Frame Paley
250
Description of Auburn The Village Preacher _ Goldsmith
252
Wile Children and Friends W A Spencer
256
Reflections on a Future State Thomson
259
To the Sea Keate
261
Falls of the Xingara Greenwood
262
The Same continued
264
6 The Same concluded
266
6ii The Present Condition of Man vindicated Pope
268
Battle of Thermopylae
269
The Cotters Saturday Night Burns
275
A Summer Evening in America
276
Influence of Nature on the Heart
277
The HOI of Science Aikin
278
Evening Anonymous
281
SelfCulture Channing
282
The Same continued
284
The Ideas of the Divine Mind the Origin of every Quality pleasing to the Imagi nation Akenside
286
Education Bishop Potter
290
The Rich Man and the Beggar Pollok
291
The Simple Man and the Wise Man Pollok
293
An Allegory Johnson
294
The Same continued
296
The Advantages of Retirement Young
298
The Changes and varied Appearances of Creation Young
299
The Folly of a mere worldly Spirit Young
300
Thoughts on Time Young
301
The Man whose Thoughts are not of this World Young
303
The Deluge
322
The Antediluvians
324
The Captive Lady restored to her Lover by Scipio
328
The Ruins
330
Practice and Habit John Locke
331
Pleasures of Memory Rogers
333
The Elders Death Bed Professor Wilson
334
The Evening Cloud Wilson
339
Thanatopsis W C Bryant
340
The Parliament Oak W Irving
342
The Wife W Irving
343
Soliloquy Macbeth meditating the Mur der of Duncan Shakspeare
351
Clarences Dream Shakspeare
352
Wolseys Soliloquy after his Downfall Shakspeare
354
Birds of Spring W Irving
355
Portrait of a Dutchman W Irving
359
Hamlet on the Immortality of the Soul Shakspeare
360
The Voices of the Dead Dewey
361
The Same continued
364
Pleasures of Hope Campbell
366
The Soldiers Return Bloomfield
367
Observation Chalmers
370
Discretion Addison
373
Night Montgomery
376
Home Montgomery
378
Contemplation Thomson
380
The Voyage of Life Dr Johnson
381
Poetic Style Pope
384
Burial of Sir John Moore Wolfe
385
The Mariners Dream Dimond
386
Mary the Maid of the Inn Southey
392
The Same continued
394
Ginevra Rogers
396
On Wisdom Robert Hall
399
Love of Fame W Irving
400
Some Traits of Sir Walter Scotts Char acter W Irving
401
Character of Goldsmith W Irving
403
Domestic Life of an Indian W Irving
405
The World of Chance Todd
407
The Same continued
410
Solitude PoUok 41S 141 Benjamin Franklin Anonymousr
414
The Vision of Columbus Barlow
415
Battle of Bunkers Hill Blake
417
Warrens Address at the Battle of Bun kers Hill Pierpont
423
Reflections among the Ruins of Copan in Central America John L Stephens
424
The Dying Boy Mrs Sigourney
426
Voyage up the Hudson W Irving
428
The Character of Columbus W Irving
432
A Thunder Storm on the Hudson W Irving
435
To Mary in Heaven Burnt
437
Happiness Anonymous
438
Webster Anne C Lynch
442
The Same continued
444
Stanzas on Death Anonymous
447
The Evils of War H Clay
448
Time arresting the Career of Pleasure Miss London
450
A Practical Philosopher W Irving
451
Written at my Mothers Grave G D Prentice
454
Invisible Companions W Irving
457
The Storm Ship W Irving
460
The Knell of Time Anonymous
467
Destruction of Sennacherib Byron
468
What the Teacher should be Martineau
469
Value of Books Bishop Potter
471
Touch not taste not handle not Beecher
473
A Sequel to the Same Beecher
475
The Festal Board Anonymous
476
Franklin at the Fireside
478
Venice A Court of Justice Shakspeare
479
Pompeys Pillar Irving
488
The Mosscovered Bucket Woodworih
491
Traits of Indian Character W Irving
492
Value of Time and Knowledge Halves
503
The Rainbow Campbell
506
The Story of a disabled Soldier Goldsmith
508
Song of the Angels MiMon
511
Every Man the Architect of his own For tune Macdiarmid
513
Hymn on the Seasons Thomson
518
Picture of the Miseries of War Anonymous
521
Thunder Storm on the Prairies W Irving
522
Lamentations of the Moors for the Battle of Lucena W Irving
525
Works of the Coral Insect Univ Review
528
Exhibitions of Genius Portland Tributte
536
The Last Minstrel Walter Scott
543

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Page 383 - flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar. When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line, too, labors, and the words move slow. Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main
Page 165 - Or heap the shrine of Luxury and Pride With incense kindled at the Muse's flame. 19. Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife Their sober wishes never learned to stray ; Along the cool, sequestered vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their way. 20. Yet e'en these hones from insult to protect,
Page 166 - birth, And Melancholy marked him for her own. 31. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere ; Heaven did a recompense as largely send : He gave to Misery (all he had) a tear, He gained from Heaven ('twas all he wished) a friend. 32. No further seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties
Page 114 - wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory ; And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue. 5. If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle ; I remember The first time ever
Page 383 - 4. True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, As those move easiest who have learned to dance. 'Tis not enough no harshness gives offence; The sound must seem an echo to the sense : Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother
Page 252 - Kemote from towns he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had changed, nor wished to change, his place ; Unskilful he to fawn, or seek for power By doctrines fashioned to the varying hour; Far other aims his heart had learned to prize, More bent to raise the wretched than to rise.
Page 113 - Body. 1. FRIENDS, Romans, countrymen! lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them ; The good is oft interred with their bones : So let it be with Cffisar ! The noble Brutus Hath told you
Page 147 - some few to be chewed and digested ; that is, some books are to be read only in part; others to be read, but not curiously ; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy,
Page 148 - things. Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. — BACON.
Page 106 - Fountains, and ye that warble as ye flow, Melodious murmurs, warbling, tune his praise. Join voices, all ye living souls: ye birds, That singing up to heaven's gate ascend, Bear on your wings and in your notes his praise. Ye that in waters glide, and ye that walk The earth, and stately tread,

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