Biographical Illustrations of St. Paul's Cathedral

Front Cover
Whittaker and Company, 1843 - Great Britain - 114 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 69 - A man so various, that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome ; Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was every thing by fits, and nothing long ; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon.
Page 37 - My Shakspeare, rise ! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further off, to make thee room : Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live, And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Page 8 - though forgive that sin through which I run, And do run still, though still I do deplore ? When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more. " Wilt thou forgive that sin which I have won Others to sin, and made my sin their door ? Wilt thou forgive that sin which
Page 17 - grace, yet want his peers' ; To have thy asking, yet wait many years ; To fret thy soul with crosses and with cares ; To eat thy heart through comfortless despairs ; To fawn, to crouch, to wait, to ride, to run, To spend, to give, to wait, to be undone.
Page 183 - feeling of humanity: and, my lords, they shock every sentiment of honour; they shock me as a lover of honourable war, and a détester of murderous barbarity. These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation. I call upon the right reverend bench, those
Page 17 - I hope it is no very cynical asperity not to confess obligations where no benefit has been received, or to be unwilling that the public should consider me as owing that to a patron which Providence has enabled me to do for myself.
Page 17 - I am solitary and cannot impart it,—till I am known and do not want it. I hope it is no very cynical asperity not to confess obligations where no benefit has been received, or to be unwilling that the public should consider me as owing that to a patron which Providence has enabled me to do for myself.
Page 144 - is meanly imagined ; he is the common drybones of every vulgar tale. It was not so that Milton dealt with this difficult allegory. We are satisfied with the indistinct image which he gives us :— What seemed his head The likeness of a kingly crown had on. We have no grinning
Page 177 - atrocious crime of being a young man, which the honourable gentleman has with such spirit and decency charged upon me, I shall neither attempt to palliate nor deny, but content myself with wishing that I may be one of those, whose follies cease with their youth, and not one of that number who are ignorant in spite of
Page 17 - had it been early, had been kind ; but it has been delayed until I am indifferent and cannot enjoy it,—till I am solitary and cannot impart it,—till I am known and do not want it.

Bibliographic information