Political Innovation in America: The Politics of Policy Initiation

Front Cover
Yale University Press, Jul 1, 1985 - Political Science - 185 pages

How are public policies initiated in American politics? Do they spring fully formed from the furrowed brow of the President? Are they the product of congressional committees? This pathbreaking book by Nelson Polsby looks for the first time at the process of political innovation. Drawing examples from foreign and domestic policy, Polsby examines the genesis of eight major new government initiatives: the Peace Corps, the Truman Doctrine, the Council of Economic Advisers, Medicare, Community Action Programs, the National Science Foundation, civilian, control of atomic energy, and the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.

Polsby has explored empirically the preconditions of political innovations, and he draws conclusions that have general applicability for the understanding of innovation in the American political system. His characteristically witty and stimulating book opens a third branch of inquiry in political science--on a coequal footing with the study of legislative enactment politics and the study of policy implementation.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Limits and Opportunities
6
A Brief Guide to the Cases
14
The Creation of the National Science Foundation
35
The Nuclear Test Ban Treaty
55
Foreign Policy Innovation
75
The Formation of the Peace Corps
91
Domestic Innovation
100
National Health Insurance for the Aged
112
Local Participation in Community Action Programs
128
Innovations Compared
146
What Causes Innovation?
159
Political Crisis and the Potential for Policy Innovation
167
Index
175
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information