Cannabis: The Genus Cannabis

Front Cover
David T Brown
CRC Press, Sep 2, 2003 - Science - 272 pages
2 Reviews
This book provides a comprehensive overview of cannabis use and abuse and will be an invaluable source of reference for anyone with an interest in the wide range of applications of this fascinating plant and its therapeutic and commercial potential
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Is this price a joke?
Has to be.. No book is worth almost 100 quid. Specialy not a ebook. Ridiculous

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Anal sex (also called anal intercourse) is the sex act in which the penis is inserted into the anus of a sexual partner.[1][2] The term can also include other sexual acts involving the anus, including pegging, anilingus, fingering, and object insertion.[1][2]
While anal sex is commonly associated with male homosexuality, research shows not all gay males engage in anal sex and that it is not uncommon in heterosexual relationships.[1][3][4][5] Types of anal sex can also be a part of lesbian sexual practices.[6]
Many people find anal sex pleasurable, and some may reach orgasm — through stimulation of the prostate in men, and clitoral and G-Spot leg stimulation in women.[7][8][9][10] However, many people find it painful as well, sometimes extremely so,[11][12] which may be primarily due to psychological factors in some cases.[13]
As with most forms of sexual interaction, anal sex participants risk contracting sexually transmitted diseases;[14][15] anal sex is considered a high-risk sexual practice because of the vulnerability of the anus and rectum. The anal and rectal tissues are delicate and do not provide natural lubrication, so they can easily tear and permit disease transmission, especially if lubricant is not used. Unprotected anal sex is considered the riskiest form of sexual intercourse;[1][2][16] authorities such as the WHO issue recommendations for making anal sex safer.[14
 

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page viii - Examples are the muscle relaxants based on the arrow poison, curare, from species of Chondrodendron, and the antimalarials derived from species of Cinchona and Artemisia. The methods of detection of pharmacological activity have become increasingly reliable and specific, frequently involving enzymes in bioassays and avoiding the use of laboratory animals. By using bioassay linked fractionation of crude plant juices or extracts, compounds can be specifically targeted which, for example, inhibit blood...
Page viii - Such methods as in vitro fertilisation, meristem cultures and somatic embryogenesis are used. The transfer of sections of DNA is giving rise to controversy in the case of some enduses of the plant material. Some suppliers of plant raw material are now able to certify that they are supplying organically-farmed medicinal plants, herbs and spices. The Economic Union directive (CVO/EU No 2092/91) details the specifications for the obligatory quality controls to be carried out at all stages of production...
Page viii - Some suppliers of plant raw material are now able to certify that they are supplying organically- farmed medicinal plants, herbs and spices. The Economic Union directive (CVO/EU No 2092/91) details the specifications for the obligatory quality controls to be carried out at all stages of production and processing of organic products. Fascinating plant folklore and ethnopharmacology leads to medicinal potential. Examples are the muscle relaxants based on the arrow poison, curare, from species of Chondrodendmn,...
Page ix - Medicine and this office in 1994 assisted the filing of several Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, required for clinical trials of some Chinese herbal preparations. The significance of these applications was that each Chinese preparation involved several plants and yet was handled as a single IND. A demonstration of the contribution of efficacy, of each ingredient of each plant, was not required.
Page iii - ... of industrial importance. Edited by Dr Roland Hardman Volume 1 Valerian, edited by Peter J. Houghton Volume 2 Perilla, edited by He-ci Yu, Kenichi Kosuna and Megumi Haga Volume 3 Poppy, edited by Jeno Bernath Volume 4 Cannabis, edited by David T.
Page 245 - DEVANE, WA, HANUS, L., BREUER, A., PERTWEE, RG, STEVENSON, LA, GRIFFIN, G., GIBSON, D., MANDELBAUM, A., ETINGER, A.
Page viii - The plant raw materials are roots, rhizomes, bulbs, leaves, stems, barks, wood, flowers, fruits and seeds. These yield gums, resins, essential (volatile) oils, fixed oils, waxes, juices, extracts and spices for medicinal and aromatic purposes. All these commodities are traded world-wide. A dealer's market report for an item may say "Drought in the country of origin has forced up prices". Natural products do not mean safe products and account of this has to be taken by the above industries, which...

About the author (2003)

David Brown was born in Nottingham in the UK in 1961. Brought up in the Methodist Church he felt the call to become a Lay Preacher at the tender age of 20 whilst a student at Bath University, becoming fully accredited in 1984. For 25 years he led worship, developing a distinctive preaching style based on narratives. Determined to engage with his congregations he cast his sermons in the guise of stories, enabling the listeners to become caught up in the characters and allowing him to explore complex and sometimes emotive issues from the perspective of an observer, subjects that might have been more difficult in a straightforward exposition. In 2003 David had a collection of his stories published in the UK by SPCK. It sold moderately well for a book by an unknown author but it was of its time and as his theological understanding developed over time so too did the content of the stories, focussing more and more on theology and the real-life implications of belief. However in 2009 he took a life-changing decision to move to north Wales with his wife to run a guest house, a move that in effect meant ending his association with the Methodist Church. David is now engaged in a 'ministry of hospitality', welcoming guests to the Welsh coast and the Snowdonia National Park. His days of formal preaching are over but he retains an interest in writing and photography and spends what little free time he now has appreciating the beauty and diversity of creation so evident all around him.

Bibliographic information