Army Architecture in the West: Forts Laramie, Bridger, and D.A. Russell, 1849-1912

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University of Oklahoma Press, 2004 - History - 288 pages

During the nineteenth century, the U.S. military built numerous forts across the country as it stationed more and more troops west of the Mississippi. When most people think about military forts in the American West, they imagine imposing strongholds, meccas of defense enclosed by high, palisaded walls. This popular view, however, is far from reality.

In Army Architecture in the West, Alison K. Hoagland dispels the myth that all western forts were uniform structures of military might churned out according to a master set of plans authorized by army officials in Washington, D.C. Instead, by examining three exemplary Wyoming forts, Hoagland reveals that widely varying architectural designs were used to construct western forts.

With more than 120 illustrations, Army Architecture in the West offers a new way of using architecture to gain insight into the role of the army in the American West. By focusing on the tangible remains of the army’s presence in the West, Hoagland presents a new vision of American military history.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Purpose and Plan
13
Purpose and Plan
79
Architecture
119
Furnishings and Conveniences
172
Purpose Plan
203
Epilogue
244
Notes
251
Bibliography
269
Index
283
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Alison K. Hoagland is Associate Professor of History and Historic Preservation at Michigan Technological University.

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