The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Volume 1

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University of California Press, Jan 1, 1986 - History - 862 pages
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In this revisionist study of Roman imperialism in the Greek world, Gruen considers the Hellenistic context within which Roman expansion took place. The evidence discloses a preponderance of Greek rather than Roman ideas: a noteworthy readiness on the part of Roman policymakers to adjust to Hellenistic practices rather than to impose a system of their own.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Alliances and Entanglements
13
The Informal
54
Adjudication and Arbitration
96
Patrocinium and Clientela
158
Eastern Experts and Attitudes
203
Culture and Policy
250
The Roman Concept of Empire
273
Rome and Greece I
437
Rome and Greece II
481
Rome and Asia Minor I
529
Rome and Asia Minor II
569
Rome and the Seleucid Kingdom
611
Rome and Ptolemaic Egypt
672
Conclusion
721
Appendix n The First Encounter of Rome
745

The Tangible Benefits of Empire
288
The Greek View of Roman
316
Part in The Patterns of Behavior
358
Rome Macedonia and Illyria II
399

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About the author (1986)

Erich S. Gruen is Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of "The Last Generation of the Roman Republic "(California, 1974), "The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome "(California, 1984), "Studies in Greek Culture and Roman Policy "(1990), "Culture and National Identity in Republican Rome "(1992), and "Diaspora: Jews amidst the Greeks and Romans "(forthcoming).

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