The Autonomy of Law: Essays on Legal Positivism

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Robert P. George
Oxford University Press, 1999 - Law - 339 pages
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This collection of original papers from distinguished legal theorists offers a challenging assessment of the nature and viability of legal positivism, a branch of legal theory which continues to dominate contemporary legal theoretical debates. To what extent is the law adequately described as autonomous? Should law claim autonomy? These and other questions are addressed by the authors in this carefully edited collection, and it will be of interest to all lawyers and scholars interested in legal philosophy and legal theory.
 

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Contents

Distinguishing Features
1
Positivism as Pariah
31
Does Positivism Matter?
57
Laws Autonomy and Public Practical Reason
79
The Separation Thesis
119
The Concept of Law and The Concept of
163
The Truth in Legal Positivism
195
Laws Normative Claims
215
Intention in Interpretation
249
Authority and Reason
287
Natural Law and Positive
321
Index
335
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About the author (1999)

Robert George is Professor of Law at Princeton University. He is a former Judicial Fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States and presidential Appointee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights

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