The Private Journal of Madame Campan: Comprising Original Anecdotes of the French Court; Selections from Her Correspondence, Thoughts on Education, &c., &c

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A. Small, 1825 - France - 268 pages
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Page 8 - It happened that about this time my husband was attacked with a pulmonary disorder, and he desired that he might be conveyed to Mesmer's house. Being introduced into the apartment occupied by M. Campan, I asked the worker of miracles what treatment he proposed to adopt ; he very coolly replied, that to ensure a speedy and perfect cure, it would be necessary to lay, in the bed of the invalid, at his left side, one of three things, namely, a young woman of brown complexion ; a black hen ; or an empty...
Page 7 - Campan, my husband, was his partizan, like almost every person who moved in high life. To be magnetized was then a fashion ; nay, it was more, it was absolutely a rage. In the drawing-rooms, nothing was talked of but the brilliant discovery. There was to be no more dying ; people's heads were turned, and their...
Page 45 - The Abbe' B one day told Madame Campan that during his residence in Italy he frequently saw in the public streets monks of various orders, mounted on chairs or planks of wood, preaching or holding conferences. When these conferences took place in the churches a Christ, as large as a child, whose head was made to move by means of a spring, was supported by one of the chorister boys, concealed within the pulpit. During these conferences the priests addressed the Christ, and inquired whether...
Page 105 - When first a beloved child, releasing itself from its nurse's arms, ventures its little tottering steps on the soft carpet, or the smoothest grass-plot, the poor mother scarcely breathes ; she imagines that these first efforts of nature are attended with every danger to the object most dear to her. Fond mother, calm...
Page 45 - I cannot refrain from recording it here. The Marchioness de Forges, whose husband was grand falconer, resided at Versailles, in the year 1775. The Marchioness was pregnant, and during childbirth, some unpleasant intelligence was communicated to her. If I recollect rightly, she was informed that one of her houses had been burnt down. The pains of child-birth immediately ceased, and the Marchioness continued pregnant for the space of twenty-five years. At the expiration of that period she died ; and...
Page 8 - All magnetic remedies that were employed produced no effect. Perceiving his failure, Mesmer took advantage of the periods of my absence to bleed and blister the patient. I was not informed of what had been done until after M. Campan's recovery. Mesmer was asked for a certificate, to prove that the patient had been cured by means of magnetism only ; and he gave it. Here was a trait of enthusiasm! Truth was no longer respected. When I next presented myself to the queen (Marie-Antoinette), their majesties...
Page 36 - I were to observe the least pretension on account of the rank or fortune of parents, I should immediately put an end to it. The most perfect equality is preserved ; distinction is awarded only to merit and industry.
Page 19 - I am astonished that you are not more awed in our presence ; you speak to us with as much familiarity as when we were your pupils ! " — " The best thing you can do," replied Madame Campan, " is to forget your titles when you are " with me ; for I can never be afraid of queens whom I
Page 7 - To be magnetized waź then a fashion; nay, it was more, it was absolutely ft rage. In the drawing-rooms, nothing was talked of but the brilliant discovery. There was to be no more dying ; people's heads were turned, and their imaginations heated in the highest degree. To accomplish this object, it was necessary to bewilder the understanding ; and Mesmer, with his singular language, produced that effect. To put a stop to the fit of public insanity was the grand difficulty ; and it was proposed to...
Page 111 - Learn to know the value of money. This is a most essential point. The want of economy leads to the decay of powerful empires, as well as private families. Louis XVI. perished on the scaffold for a deficit of fifty millions. There would have been no debt, no assemblies of the people, no revolution, no loss of the sovereign authority, no tragical death, but for this fatal deficit. States...

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