Educated in Romance: Women, Achievement, and College Culture

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University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 1992 - Education - 273 pages
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Is romance more important to women in college than grades are? Why do so many women enter college with strong academic backgrounds and firm career goals but leave with dramatically scaled-down ambitions? Dorothy C. Holland and Margaret A. Eisenhart expose a pervasive "culture of romance" on campus: a high-pressure peer system that propels women into a world where their attractiveness to men counts most.
 

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Educated in romance: women, achievement, and college culture

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This ethnographic study by two sociocultural anthropologists explores why bright, highly motivated young women fail to fulfill their academic and career goals. Through interviews and field ... Read full review

Contents

Why Study Womens Responses to Schooling?
3
The Odyssey behind the Case
10
Reproduction Theory and the Gender
25
Questions about Womens Responses
43
Campus Profiles and an Overview of the Study
63
The Past and the Present
79
Fragile Ties with Other Women
108
Getting into the World of Romance
119
Pathways to Marginal Careers
181
Womens Discontents with the University
202
Conclusions
209
Unfinished Lives
211
Research Design and Methods
233
Notes
237
References
253
Glossary
265

Gender Politics and Peer Divisions
152
Schoolwork for What?
163

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About the author (1992)

Dorothy C. Holland is professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Margaret A. Eisenhart is professor of education at the University of Colorado at Boulder.


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