Memoirs of Count Lavallette, Volume 1

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H. Colburn and R. Bentley, 1831 - France
 

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Page xxxii - At length the iron gates of the prison, shutting with great force, awoke me again. I made my repeater strike ; it was no more than midnight, so that the horrible phantasmagoria had lasted no more than two or three minutes — that is to say, the time necessary for relieving the sentry and shutting the gate. The cold was severe and the watchword short. The next day the turnkey confirmed my calculations.
Page xxxii - for five hours, and they were followed by an immense number of artillery wagons, full of bleeding corpses, whose limbs still quivered. A disgusting smell of blood and bitumen almost choked me. At length the iron gate of the prison shutting with great force awoke me again. I made my repeater strike. It was no more than midnight, so that the horrible phantasmagoria had lasted no more than ten minutes — that is to say, the time necessary for relieving the sentry and shutting the gate.
Page xxxii - I thought, continued for five hours ; and they were followed by an immense number of artillery- waggons, full of bleeding corpses, whose limbs still quivered ; a disgusting smell of blood and bitumen almost choked me. At length, the iron gate of the prison shutting with great force, awoke me again. I made my repeater strike ; it was no more than midnight, so that the horrible phantasmagoria...
Page xxxi - One night, while I was asleep, the clock of the Palais de Justice struck twelve and awoke me. I heard the gate open to relieve the sentry, but I fell asleep again immediately. In this sleep I dreamt that I was standing in the Rue St.
Page xxxii - Pale and dishevelled women appeared and disappeared alternately at the windows in dismal silence ; low, inarticulate groans filled the air, and I remained in the street alone, petrified with horror, and deprived of strength sufficient to seek my safety by flight.
Page xxxi - A melancholy darkness spread around me ; all was still ; nevertheless, a low and uncertain sound soon arose. All of a sudden. I perceived at the bottom of the street, and advancing towards me, a troop of cavalry, the men and horses, however, all flayed.
Page xxxi - Their hollow eyes rolled fearfully in their sockets, their mouths opened from ear to ear, and helmets of hanging flesh covered their hideous heads. The horses dragged along their own skins in the kennels, which overflowed with blood on all sides.
Page 34 - ... of a human head at the end of a lance ! The disfigured and pale features, the gory locks, the half-open mouth, the closed eyes, images of death added to the gestures and salutations which the executioners made them perform in horrible mockery of life, presented the most frightful spectacle that rage could have imagined. A troop of women, ugly as crime itself, swarming like insects, and wearing grenadiers' hairy caps, went continually to and fro, howling barbarous songs, embracing and insulting...
Page 221 - Lepaux, and Barthelemy. The first four had been members of the Convention; and although none of them had been famous during the Reign of Terror for any atrocious act, still the three first had voted the death of the King — a vote which, notwithstanding the fatal though powerful consideration that may be presented in alleviation, placed them amongst the most furious Jacobins, and was prejudicial to the respect with which they ought to have been invested.

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