The Psychology of Cultural Experience

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 6, 2001 - Psychology - 247 pages
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This volume identifies an emerging synthesis in psychological anthropology and presents the new research agenda taking shape as the discipline moves beyond the postmodernist critique. United by a desire to better understand the relationship of individual experience to culture, the individual authors use a range of contemporary approaches in the field, including person-centered ethnography, activity theory, attachment and object relations theory, and cultural schema theory. Taken together, these chapters demonstrate the importance of basing comparative studies on categories derived from fine-grained accounts of personal experience.
 

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Contents

Beyond the binary opposition in psychological anthropology integrating contemporary psychoanalysis and cognitive science
21
Developments in personcentered ethnography
48
Activity theory and cultural psychology
68
Acquiring modifying and transmitting culture
81
The infants acquisition of culture early attachment reexamined in anthropological perspective
83
The remembered past in a culturally meaningful life remembering as cultural social and cognitive process
105
Continuity and change in cultural experience
149
The psychology of consensus in a Papua New Guinea Christian revival movement
151
God and self the shaping and sharing of experience in a cooperative religious community
173
A reinvigorated comparative perspective
197
Crosscultural studies in language and thought is there a metalanguage?
199
Comparative approaches to psychological anthropology
223
Name index
238
Subject index
240
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