Eugenics and Other Evils: An Argument Against the Scientifically Organized State

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Inkling Books, 2000 - Science - 179 pages
3 Reviews
During the first three decades of the twentieth century, eugenics, the scientific control of human breeding, was a popular cause within enlightened and progressive segments of the English-speaking world. The New York Times eagerly supported it, gushing about the wonderful "new science." Prominent scientists, such as the plant biologist Luther Burbank, were among its most enthusiastic supporters. And the Carnegie and Rockefeller foundations generously funded eugenic research intended to distinguish the 'fit' from the 'unfit.'
 

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Review: Eugenics and Other Evils: An Argument Against the Scientifically Organized State

User Review  - Carl Hesler - Goodreads

I am thankful that GKC could write a book like this. Read full review

Contents

What Is Eugenics?
13
The First Obstacles
19
The Anarchy from Above
26
The Lunatic and the Law
31
The Flying Authority
40
The Unanswered Challenge
49
The Established Church of Doubt
56
A Summary of a False Theory
62
The Transformation of Socialism
107
The End of Household Goods
113
A Short Chapter
120
Hereditary Talent and Character
123
Eugenics Its Definition Scope and Aims
127
The Progress of Eugenics
131
Two Decades of Eugenics
135
Eugenics Review
139

The Impotence of Impenitence
66
The History of a Tramp
72
The History of a Eugenist
79
The Vengeance of the Flesh
86
The Meanness of the Motive
92
The Eclipse of Liberty
100
Eugenics Review and the Mental Deficiency Act
144
Birth Control News and Forced Sterilization
150
Birth Control News and the Unfit
156
Birth Control News and Eugenics
162
Index
168
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England, in 1874. He began his education at St Paul's School, and later went on to study art at the Slade School, and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind's spiritual progress. After Chesterton converted to Catholicism in 1922, he wrote mainly on religious topics. Chesterton is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in "The Innocence of Father Brown." Chesterton died in 1936 at the age of 62.

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