Samuel Adams

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1885 - Politicians - 442 pages
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Page 17 - Whether it be lawful to resist the Supreme Magistrate, if the Commonwealth cannot otherwise be preserved...
Page 44 - Every man of an immense crowded audience appeared to me to go away as I did, ready to take arms against Writs of Assistance. Then and there, was the first scene of the first act of opposition to the arbitrary claims of Great Britain. Then and there, the child Independence was born.
Page 82 - House. I would fain know by whom an American is represented here ? Is he represented by any knight of the shire, in any county in this kingdom ? Would to God that respectable representation was augmented to a greater number ! Or will you tell him that he is represented by any representative of a borough — a borough which, perhaps, its own representatives never saw ? This is what is called ' the rotten part of the constitution.
Page 76 - There they smoke tobacco till you cannot see from one end of the garret to the other. There they drink flip, I suppose, and there they choose a moderator, who puts questions to the vote regularly ; and selectmen, assessors, collectors, wardens, firewards, and representatives, are regularly chosen before they are chosen in the town.
Page 76 - ... meets in one room. There they smoke tobacco till you cannot see from one end of the garret to the other. There they drink flip, I suppose, and...
Page 8 - Hancock was dressed in a red velvet cap, within which was one of fine linen. The latter was turned up over the lower edge of the velvet one, two or three inches. He wore a blue damask gown lined with silk, a white stock, a white satin embroidered waistcoat, black satin small-clothes, white silk stockings, and red morocco slippers.
Page 320 - I should advise persisting in our struggle for liberty, though it were revealed from heaven that nine hundred and ninety-nine were to perish, and only one of a thousand were to survive, and retain his liberty ! One such free man must possess more virtue, and enjoy more happiness, than a thousand slaves ; and let him propagate his like, and transmit to them what he hath so nobly preserved.
Page 106 - The house is fully satisfied, that your assembly is too generous and enlarged in sentiment to believe, that this letter proceeds from an ambition of taking the lead, or dictating to the other assemblies; they freely submit their opinion to the judgment of others ; and shall take it kind in your house to point out to them any thing further that may be thought necessary.
Page 272 - As the very being of every colony, considered as a free people, depends upon the event, a thought so dishonorable to our brethren cannot be entertained, as that this town will now be left to struggle alone.
Page 104 - The establishment of a Protestant episcopate in America is very zealously contended for (by a party in the British Parliament) ; and it is very alarming to a people whose fathers, from the hardships they suffered under such an establishment, were obliged to fly their native country into a wilderness in order peaceably to enjoy their privileges — civil and religious. We hope in God that such an establishment will never take place in America...

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