The Physical Geography of the Sea and Its Meteorology

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Sampson Low, Son & Marston, 1869 - Marine meteorology - 491 pages
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Page 103 - All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Page 277 - To make the weight for the winds ; And he weigheth the waters by measure. When he made a decree for the rain, And a way for the lightning of the thunder : Then did he see it, and declare it ; He prepared it, yea, and searched it out. And unto man he said, Behold, The fear of the LORD, that is wisdom ; And to depart from evil is understanding.
Page 277 - The gold and the crystal cannot equal it: and the exchange of it shall not be for jewels of fine gold. No mention shall be made of coral, or of pearls: for the price of wisdom is above rubies.
Page 299 - Who hath measured the waters in the hollow of his hand, and meted out heaven with the span, and comprehended the dust of the earth in a measure, and weighed the mountains in scales, and the hills in a balance?
Page 277 - Seeing it is hid from the eyes of all living, and kept close from the fowls of the air. Destruction and death say, "We have heard the fame thereof with our ears.
Page 14 - It surrounds us on all sides, yet we see it not; it presses on us with a load of fifteen pounds on every square inch of surface of our bodies, or from seventy to one hundred tons on us in all,, yet we do not so much as feel its weight. Softer than the softest down, more impalpable than the finest gossamer-- it leaves the cobweb undisturbed, and scarcely stirs the lightest flower that feeds on the dew it supplies; yet it bears the fleets of nations on its wings around the world, and crushes the most...
Page 277 - God understandeth the way thereof, and he knoweth the place thereof. For he looketh to the ends of the earth, and seeth under the whole heaven; To make the weight for the winds; and he weigheth the waters by measure. When he made a decree for the rain, and a way for the lightning of the thunder; Then did he see it, and declare it; he prepared it, yea, and searched it out.
Page 22 - There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Seas. It is the Gulf Stream.
Page 55 - Stream may be; but assuming the temperature and velocity, at the depth of two hundred fathoms to be those of the surface, and taking the...
Page 61 - The sea, therefore, we may safely infer, has its offices and duties to perform; so may we infer, have its currents, and so, too, its inhabitants ; consequently, he who undertakes to study its phenomena must cease to regard it as a waste of waters. He must look upon it as a part of that exquisite machinery by which the harmonies of nature are preserved, and then he will begin to perceive the developments of order and the evidences of design; these make it a most beautiful and interesting subject for...

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