The Complete Works of Sir Philip Sidney

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Reprint Services Corporation, Dec 21, 2007 - Literary Collections - 456 pages
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Contents

THE DEFENCE OF Poefie
1
A DISCOURSE ON IRISH AFFAIRS
46
A DISCOURSE OF SYR PH S TO THE QUEENES MAJESTY TOUCHING HIR MARIAGE WITH MONSIEUR
51
DEFENCE OF THE EARL OF LEICESTER
61
CORRESPONDENCE
73
TRANSLATIONS
185
THE PSALMS OF DAVID
187
A Woorke concerning the trewnesse of the Christian Religion
247
APPENDIX
368
NOTES
377
A LIST OF MISPRINTS ETC WHICH HAVE BEEN CORRECTED
423
A LIST OF MISPRINTS ETC WHICH SHOULD HAVE BEEN CORRECTED
424
INDEX OF NAMES
425
INDEX OF FIRST LINES OF PSALMS
437
CORRIGENDA
439

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Page 8 - ... disdaining to be tied to any such subjection, lifted up with the vigour of his own invention, doth grow in effect into another nature, in making things either better than Nature bringeth forth, or, quite anew - forms such as never were in Nature, as the Heroes, Demigods, Cyclops...
Page 10 - ... the meaner sort of painters (who counterfeit only such faces as are set before them) and the more excellent: who, having no law but wit, bestow that in colours upon you which is fittest for the eye to see: as the constant, though lamenting look of Lucretia, when she punished in herself another's fault.
Page 8 - ... chimeras, furies, and such like; so as he goeth hand in hand with nature, not enclosed within the narrow warrant of her gifts but freely ranging...
Page 13 - The philosopher therefore and the historian are they which would win the goal, the one by precept, the other by example. But both not having both, do both halt.
Page 10 - For these third be they which most properly do imitate to teach and delight; and to imitate borrow nothing of what is, hath been, or shall be ; but range, only reined with learned discretion, into the divine consideration of what may be and should be.
Page 26 - Since, then, poetry is of all human learnings the most ancient, and of most fatherly antiquity, as from whence other learnings have taken their beginnings; since it is so universal that no learned nation doth despise it, nor barbarous nation is without it; since both Roman and Greek gave such divine names unto it, the one of prophesying, the other of making, and that indeed that name of making...
Page 11 - ... it is that feigning notable images of virtues, vices, or what else, with that delightful teaching, which must be the right describing note to know a Poet by.

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