Fire from Heaven: Studies in Syriac Theology and Liturgy

Front Cover
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - Religion - 368 pages
1 Review
This fourth collection by Sebastian Brock focuses on three areas: the christology of the Church of the East, with the argument that the traditional characterisation of this Church as 'Nestorian' is not only unsatisfactory, but also thoroughly misleading; the distinctive phraseology of the invocations to the Holy Spirit in the Syriac liturgical tradition, hearkening back to Jewish roots; and two important early Commentaries on the Liturgy.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I am a ten year old kid. I like this book. I was writing a sermon. My mom was helping me write the sermon because I'm a ten year old kid. My sermon is about holy fire. This is a nice book, but it's really hard to understand which is why I'm giving it a four star rating.
This is the aforementioned mom. Although I am not a religious scholar I found this book and its discussion of the early Syrian church's liturgy and homilies to be very interesting and relevant to a a better understanding of both the church and the ancient culture. My son also appreciated it. The Syrians and my son share an appreciation for the religious intensity present in the emphasis on fire as a metaphor and carrier of God in our every day spiritual lives.
 

Contents

Preface
121
THE CHRISTOLOGY OF THE CHURCH OF THE EAST
132
INVOCATIONS TO THE HOLY SPIRIT AND THEIR BACKGROUND
179
Towards a typology of the Epicleses in the West
219
Crossroad of Cultures Studies in Liturgy and Patristics
87
35 and the earliest Syriac
98
some remarks
106
the travels of
EDITIONS ANDTRANSLATIONS
20
Gabriel of Qatars Commentary on the Liturgy 125
1
Addenda and Corrigenda 15
1
The ruah elohim of Gen 12 and its reception history
4
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Sebastian Brock was Reader in Syriac Studies at the Oriental Institute, and is Professorial Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Oxford, UK.

Bibliographic information