MYTHS AND FOLKLORE OF IRELAND: Folklore and legends from the Emerald Isle

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Abela Publishing Ltd, 2009 - Juvenile Fiction - 280 pages
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Myths and Folklore of Ireland is the first of many works published by the renowned American translator Jeremiah Curtin. The volume is comprised of twenty-three Irish myths, in which the the legends of Fin MacCumhail feature prominently. While the collection includes tales of Kings, Queens, princes, and princesses, it also tells stories of tailors' sons, fishermen, and many other normal folks who make good in the most surprising circumstances. More given to legend than fairy, Myths and Folklore of Ireland is better suited to adult readers than children. A percentage of the profits from this book will be donated to the Prince's Trust for education scholarships for the underprivileged.
 

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User Review  - jen.e.moore - LibraryThing

The particular ebook I have is very badly OCR'd, which makes the names even harder to parse than usual. The first half of this book is mostly fairy tales in the traditional sense, albeit with more ... Read full review

Contents

THE SON of the KING of ERIN and the GIANT of LOCH LEIN
1
THE THREE DAUGHTERS of KING OHARA
17
FAIR BROWN and TREMBLING
41
THE KING of ERIN and the QUEEN of the LONESOME ISLAND 54 THE SHEE an GANNON and the GRUGACH GAIRE
72
THE THREE DAUGHTERS of the KING of the EAST and the SON of
85
THE THIRTEENTH SON of the KING of ERIN
109
KIL ARTHUR
125
BIRTH OF FIN MacCUMHAIL
150
FIN MacCUMHAIL and the FENIANS of ERIN in the CASTLE of FEAR
164
GILLA na GRAKIN and FIN MacCUMHAIL
184
FIN MacCUMHAIL the SEVEN BROTHERS and the KING of FRANCE
207
FIN MacCUMHAIL and the SON of the KING of ALBA
226
OISIN IN TIR na NOG
255
NOTES
269
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About the author (2009)

Jeremiah Curtin (6 September 1835 – 14 December 1906) was an American translator and folklorist. Born in Detroit, Michigan, Curtin spent his early life in what is now, Greendale, Wisconsin and later graduated from Harvard College in 1863. In 1864 he went to Russia, where he worked as both a translator and for the U.S. legation. He left Russia in 1877, stayed a year in London, and returned to the United States, where he worked for the Bureau of Ethnology. His specialties were his work with American Indian languages and Slavic languages.

 

In addition to publishing collections of fairy tales and folklore and writings about his travels, Curtin translated a number of volumes by Henryk Sienkiewicz, including his Trilogy set in the 17th-century Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, a couple of volumes on contemporary Poland, and, most famously and profitably, Quo Vadis (1897). He also published an English version of Bolesław Prus' only historical novel, Pharaoh, under the title The Pharaoh and the Priest (1902).