We are Your Sisters: Black Women in the Nineteenth Century

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Dorothy Sterling
W. W. Norton & Company, 1984 - History - 539 pages
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Reissued in a new trade paperback format and design, "This richly researched, sensitively edited, annotated volume portrays indelibly, in their own words, the lives of American black women before, during, and immediately after the Civil War. . . ". Following a successful run in New York, an acclaimed stage adaptation of this work is touring nationally in 1997. Photos.
 

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Contents

SLAVERY TIME i
5
Work
13
Seduction Rape Concubinage
18
Courtship and Family Life
31
Letters from Slave Women
44
Resistance
56
Resettlement
69
FREE WOMEN 18001861
85
Slavery Chain Done Broke at Last
237
View from the North
245
The Schoolmarms
261
FREEDWOMEN
307
New Beginnings
309
Slavery Made Us Tough
331
White Folks Still on Top
344
Washerwomen Maumas Exodusters Jubileers
359

First Freedom 18001831
87
g Daughters of Africa Daughters of America
104
The Antislavery Ladies
119
Women with a Special Mission
150
Teachers and Pupils
180
Black Women and the Impending Crisis
213
THE WAR YEARS
235
Some Old Acquaintances
397
Representative Women and a New Generation
418
FOUR WOMEN
451
Selected Bibliography
499
Acknowledgments
515
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

Author Dorothy Sterling was born on November 23, 1913 in Manhattan. She received a bachelor's degree from Barnard College in 1934. In the 1940's, she worked as a researcher for Life magazine, but left in frustration at a system under which women researchers gave material to men, who wrote the articles. Her first book, Sophie and Her Puppies, was published in 1951. She wrote more than 35 books for both children and adults throughout her lifetime including Freedom Train (1954), Captain of the Planter: The Story of Robert Smalls (1958), Black Foremothers: Three Lives (1979) and Close to My Heart (2005). She won numerous awards for her work including the 1976 Carter G. Woodson Book Award for The Trouble They Seen: Black People Tell the Story of Reconstruction. She died on December 1, 2008 at the age of 95.

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