Lives and Voyages of Drake, Cavendish, and Dampier: Including an Introductory View of the Earlier Discoveries in the South Sea and the History of the Bucaniers ...

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Harper & Bros., 1836 - America - 317 pages
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Page 77 - General made divers speeches to the whole company, persuading us to unity, obedience, love, and regard of our voyage ; and for the better confirmation thereof, willed every man the next Sunday following to prepare himself to receive the communion, as Christian brethren and friends ought to do. Which was done in very reverent sort, and so with good contentment every man went about his business.
Page 293 - ... nostrils, and mouth too, if the lips are not shut very close. So that from their infancy, being thus annoyed with these insects, they do never open their eyes as other people, and therefore they cannot see far unless they hold up their heads, as if they were looking at somewhat over them.
Page 146 - Esperanca ; in which voyage, I have either discovered or brought certain intelligence of all the rich places of the world, which were ever discovered by any Christian. I navigated along the coast of Chili, Peru, and New Spain, where I made great spoils. I burnt and sunk nineteen sail of ships, small and great.
Page 296 - I had long before this repented me of that roving course of life, but never with such concern as now. I did also call to mind the many miraculous acts of God's providence towards me in the whole course of my life, of which kind I believe few men have met with the like. For all these I returned thanks in a peculiar manner, and...
Page 78 - These mountains are covered with snow : at both the southerly and easterly parts of the strait there are islands, among which the sea hath his indraught into the straits even as it hath in the main entrance of the Freat.
Page 59 - ... besought Almighty GOD of His goodness, to give him life and leave to sail once in an English ship, in that sea...
Page 293 - Their eyelids are always half closed, to keep the flies out of their eyes, they being so troublesome here, that no fanning will keep them from coming to one's face...
Page 296 - The evening of this i8th day was very dismal. The sky looked very black, being covered with dark clouds ; the wind blew hard, and the seas ran high. The sea was already roaring in a white foam about us ; a dark night coming on, and no land in sight to shelter us, and our little ark in danger to be swallowed by every wave ; and what was worst of all, none of us thought ourselves prepared for another world. The reader may better guess than I can express, the confusion that we were all in.
Page 137 - But for all this we new trimmed our sails, and fitted every man his furniture, and gave them a fresh encounter with our great ordnance and also with our small shot, raking them through and through, to the killing and maiming of many of their men.
Page 166 - But more especially, because they saw them take possession of their kingdoms and dominions. Hereupon they made against them all the resistance they...

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