The Two Mentors: A Modern Story

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J. Mawman, 1803 - 386 pages
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Page 173 - ... woman dies tragically, soon after giving birth to a daughter. The next day Bennet, the narrator, seeking his own wife all over the house in which these events have transpired, finds her in the nursery. In his own words: "I found her — oh divine benevolence! emanation of the Divinity! first of the Christian virtues! — I found her giving her own breast to the poor little orphan child, while the tears rolled down her cheeks in compassion for it. I kneeled involuntarily to her as to a superior...
Page 196 - ... and delicate hand of Nature has failed to impress. Cupid has not stamped his bow upon your mouth, yet I swear by those lips, (I wish you would take a hint from one of our LITTLE though by no means one of our minor poets, and call upon me to kiss the book,) that they are beautifully ripe and ruddy, " Like to a double cherry, seeming parted, And yet an union in partition.
Page 32 - ... circumstances will admit, and continue the same until children and want force them to apply to their parish.2 Clara Reeve, who having herself lived as a domestic, knew service, intimately as an occupation, in one of her novels gives an account of two former servants such as Wendeborn describes: '. . . the habit of imitating the manners of their superiors, in the way of life they had seen, made them go to the extent of their fortune, and sometimes exceed it.'3 But whether extravagance drove them...
Page 172 - Do not grieve for me; your father, your child! live — long and happy. God bless— bless, keep you! — She fell into a fit with this exertion. We carried .the distracted man out of the room, and she. expired in a few minutes after.
Page 175 - I shall receive a legacy from an aunt ; life is uncertain ; 1 ought to do something towards providing for this poor child. I will deposit a sum in your hands for her use and benefit ; the interest of. it, you, will accept for her board and necessaries.
Page 5 - I have made enquiry after your fituation and conduct, and have gained intelligence of every ftep you have taken fince you left college. Your guardian — good heaven ! what a guardian for a...
Page 171 - I mil, said my wife, in a faltering voice, she shall be as dear to me as nay own. — Thank you, my dear friend, God bless you! — The husband ran to the bedside; he kneeled by it; he sobbed, but could not speak ; he took her hand with my wifu's in it I she tried to turned that way, but could not.
Page 93 - ... conquered the darkness. After a second night, during which Edward again demonstrates his selfcontrol, he helps her escape, and as she stepped into the coach, "touched her lips, the first and last time; for then, as Yorick says, the victory was complete." He gives her his purse and a note to his attorney. "The grateful girl could not speak for tears; she kneeled down, she embraced my knees, she lifted her clasped hands to heaven and looked a blessing upon me, but she could not articulate a word,
Page 1 - I stand in the place of a father to you? — Nay, have I not been more than a father to you: for I am no...
Page 92 - ... run; admired his beauty and magnificence." These lovers of moral beauty loved the beauty of nature too, and they conquered temptation as the sun conquered the darkness. After a second night, during which Edward again demonstrates his selfcontrol, he helps her escape, and as she stepped into the coach, "touched her lips, the first and last time; for then, as Yorick says, the victory was complete.

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