Tried and approved recipes. By a lady

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1878
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Page 68 - Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl, And, half-suspected, animate the whole. Of mordant mustard add a single spoon, Distrust the condiment that bites so soon; But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault To add a double quantity of salt; Four times the spoon with oil of Lucca crown, And twice with vinegar procured from town; And lastly o'er the flavoured compound toss A magic soupcon of anchovy sauce.
Page 14 - A good way to warm up any cold fish. Stew the oysters slowly in their own liquor for two or three minutes, take them out with a spoon, beard them, and skim the liquor, put a bit of butter into a stew-pan ; when it is melted, add as much fine bread-crumbs as will dry it up...
Page 13 - Do as above ; but stew two hours, and add a onion and pepper-corns : salt to taste. Collared Eel. — Bone a large eel, but do not skin it : mix pepper, salt, mace, allspice, and a clove or two, in the finest powder, and rub over the whole inside ; roll it tight, and bind with a coarse tape. Boil in salt and water till done, then add vinegar, and when cold keep the collar in pickle.
Page 47 - ... it. Meanwhile rub down smooth a large spoonful of rice-flour into a cup of cold milk, and mix with it two yolks of eggs well beaten. Take a basin of the boiling milk, and mix with the cold, and then pour that to the boiling ; stirring it one way till it begins to thicken, and is just going to boil up ; then pour it into a pan, stir it some time, add a large spoonful of peach water, two tea spoonsful of brandy, or a little ratifia.
Page 36 - Omelette.— Boil a dozen apples, as for sauce ; stir in a quarter of a pound of butter, and the same of white sugar ; when cold, add four eggs, well beaten ; put it into a baking dish thickly strewed over with crumbs of bread, so as to stick to the bottom and sides ; then put in the apple mixture; strew crumbs of bread over the top ; when baked, turn it out and grate loaf sugar over it.
Page 28 - CHARLOTTE. Cut a sufficient number of thin slices of white bread to cover the bottom and line the sides of a baking dish, first rubbing it thickly with butter ; put thin slices of apples into the dish in layers till the dish is full, strewing butter and sugar between.
Page 69 - True flavour needs it, and your poet begs, The pounded yellow of two well-boiled eggs. Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl, And, scarce suspected, animate the whole; And lastly, on the flavoured compound toss A magic teaspoon of anchovy sauce.
Page 65 - Pare them very thin, and simmer in a thin syrup ; let them lie a day or two. Make the syrup richer, and simmer again ; and repeat this till they are clear ; then drain, and dry them in the sun or a cool oven a very little time. They may be kept in syrup, and dried as wanted, which makes them more moist and rich.
Page 18 - Curry powder, three drachms. Celery-seed bruised, a drachm. All avoirdupois weight. Put these into a wide-mouthed bottle, stop it close, shake it up every day for a fortnight, and strain it, (when some think it improved by the addition of a quarter pint of Soy, or thick Browning,) see (No. 322), and you will have a
Page 66 - Jam. Weigh equal quantities of fruit and sugar ; put the former into a preserving-pan, boil and break it, stir constantly, and let it boil very quickly. When most of the juice is wasted, add the sugar, and simmer half an hour. This way the jam is greatly superior in colour and flavour to that which is made by putting the sugar in at first.

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