Modern Architecture

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Oxford University Press, 2002 - Architecture - 287 pages
6 Reviews
Colquhoun, an eminent scholar in the field of architecture, offers here a new account of international modernism that explores the complex motivations behind this revolutionary movement and assesses its triumphs and failures. The book focuses on the work of the main architects of the movement such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Adolf Loos, Le Corbusier, and Mies van der Rohe, re-examining their work and shedding new light on their roles as acknowledged masters. The author presents a fascinating analysis of architecture with regard to politics, technology, and ideology, all while offering clear descriptions of the key elements of the Modern movement.

Colquhoun shows clearly the evolution of the movement from Art Nouveau in the 1890s to the mega-structures of the 1960s, revealing the often-contradictory demands of form, function, social engagement, modernity and tradition.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pranogajec - LibraryThing

Filled with insightful comments, but the book has two major shortcomings: the post-WWII era is woefully underrepresented (with almost no discussion of postmodernism), as is the non-Western dimension ... Read full review

Review: Modern Architecture

User Review  - Stefan Elsholtz - Goodreads

Useful as a survey but a bit short on context and theoretical insight. Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Alan Colquhoun was born in 1921, and studied architecture in Edinburgh and London. He was in partnership with J. H. Miller from 1961 until 1988. He is currently Professor Emeritus in the School of Architecture at Princeton University. His other publications include 'Essays in Architecture: Modern Architecture and Historical Change' and 'Modernity and the Classical Tradition: Architectural Essays 1980-1987'.

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