Grandfather's Chair: A History for Youth

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Applewood Books, 2010 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 294 pages
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In 1840, Nathaniel Hawthorne, one of America's greatest writers, published Grandfather's Chair, a history of Colonial and post-Revolutionary War America especially for young people. Hawthorne uses a sturdy oak chair, which appears in each of the stories, as a way to make more entertaining the early history of America: Plymouth and the Pilgrims, the founding of Rhode Island, the Salem witch hysteria, Cotton Mather, the Liberty Tree, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Continental Congress, and the Declaration of Independence. Seventy-one black-and-white illustrations accompany the text.
 

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About the author (2010)

Born in Salem, Massachusetts, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) is one of America's greatest writers. His classic novels include The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables, both in the dark romanticism genre, with moral messages and a Puritan influence. He also wrote short stories and non-fiction. Hawthorne, who spent significant parts of his life in The Berkshires and Concord, Massachusetts, was born with the surname Hathorne. He added the "w" to distance himself from his great-great-grandfather John Hathorne, the unrepentant Salem magistrate and chief interrogator of the accused witches during the Salem witch hysteria of 1692.

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