Our Feathered Friends

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U. S. A., D. C. Heath & Company, 1899 - Birds - 144 pages
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Page 100 - Snipe ; but it is only about half its weight, seldom exceeding two ounces, or measuring more, from the tip of its beak to the end of its tail, than eight inches and a half.
Page 17 - The bird watches the falling plume until it reaches the ground, canting her head to one side to see what becomes of her tatters, and then she goes on with her dressing. Madam Bird manages very well to twist about and reach all of her clothes except her head-dress. Have you wondered how a bird can turn its head all around in a way that would cramp your .own neck if you should try it ? The neck of a bird is more flexible than yours; that is, it is furnished with more joints, so that the bird can turn...
Page 16 - But birds are very careful of their clothes, although they never try to dress more gaily than their neighbors and friends. They only try to be clean, and so they set us a very good example. Sit down on the grass under a tree, or on a seat in the park, and see the birds dress themselves. Every separate feather is cleaned and pulled and looked over, just as a woman cleans and stretches delicate lace and embroidery.
Page 17 - Sit down on the grass under a tree, or on a seat in the park, and see the birds dress themselves. Every separate feather is cleaned and pulled and looked over, just as a woman cleans and stretches delicate lace and embroidery. See how the loose feathers are pulled out and dropped, like so many useless ravellings or worn threads.
Page 18 - Some people think that a parrot is left-handed, because she always takes in her left hand the cracker or sugar which you offer to her. The next time you feed her, stop and see what you are doing. You are standing in front of the bird and offering her the cracker in your right hand. She is facing you, and of course takes the food with her left hand.
Page 17 - ... that they are not missed. If they should all come out in one day or one week, the bird would be helpless and unable to fly. If you should attempt to smooth a bird's feathers without knowing how, you would very likely make her look very ragged. Naturalists, who know how because they have practised so much, can smooth and pull the feathers as well as the bird herself.
Page 20 - A mocking-bird or a robin will let her train just touch the ground when she stretches up to look about her; but when she begins to walk again she lifts it. So you never see the tip of the longest tail one bit draggled, unless the bird is wounded or sick.
Page 21 - ... coat skirts are cut so much like the dress of his mate that we sometimes have to imagine a good deal to see any difference. But, as a rule, you can tell the male or gentleman bird because he dresses so much more gayly than his mate, although...
Page 147 - With seventeen slides, giving twenty-two constellations. .< 50. Clarke's HoW to find the Stars. Accompanies the above and helps to an acquaintance with the constellations. 47 pages. Paper. 15 cts. Guides for Science Teaching. Teachers' aids in the instruction of Natural History classes in the lower grades.
Page 19 - sharpening his bill," but he is really wiping his face. He has probably washed it in his bath a few minutes before. Some birds wear their hair done up high on their heads like a "pug," — the "crest" as we call it, standing out like the twist of the fashion.

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