The Social Transformation of American Medicine: The Rise Of A Sovereign Profession And The Making Of A Vast Industry

Front Cover
Basic Books, Aug 6, 2008 - Medical - 352 pages
Considered the definitive history of the American healthcare system, The Social Transformation of American Medicine examines how the roles of doctors, hospitals, health plans, and government programs have evolved over the last two and a half centuries. How did the financially insecure medical profession of the nineteenth century become a most prosperous one in the twentieth century? Why was national health insurance blocked? And why are corporate institutions taking over our medical care system today? Beginning in 1760 and coming up to the present day, renowned sociologist Paul Starr traces the decline of professional sovereignty in medicine, the political struggles over healthcare, and the rise of a corporate system.
Updated with a new preface and an epilogue analyzing developments since the early 1980s, this new edition of The Social Transformation of American Medicine is a must-read for anyone concerned about the future of our fraught healthcare system.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER
CHAPTER
The Triumph of Accommodation
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
Notes
Index
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

PAUL STARR is Professor of Sociology at Princeton. His The Social Transformation of American Medicine won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction. He is the co-editor of The American Prospect, lectures widely, and has consulted to the government on healthcare issues. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Bibliographic information