A Century of Eugenics in America: From the Indiana Experiment to the Human Genome Era

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Indiana University Press, 2011 - Medical - 251 pages
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In 1907, Indiana passed the world's first involuntary sterilization law based on the theory of eugenics. In time, more than 30 states and a dozen foreign countries followed suit. Although the Indiana statute was later declared unconstitutional, other laws restricting immigration and regulating marriage on "eugenic" grounds were still in effect in the U.S. as late as the 1970s. A Century of Eugenics in America assesses the history of eugenics in the United States and its status in the age of the Human Genome Project. The essays explore the early support of compulsory sterilization by doctors and legislators; the implementation of eugenic schemes in Indiana, Georgia, California, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Alabama; the legal and social challenges to sterilization; and the prospects for a eugenics movement basing its claims on modern genetic science.

 

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Contents

Looking Back at Eugenics
1
Part 1 The Indiana Origins of Eugenic Sterilization
9
Compulsory Sterilization as Moral Hygiene
11
Sterilization Laws 190774
26
Part 2 Eugenics and Popular Culture
43
Eugenics on Tobacco Road
45
Black Eugenics and the NAACP Baby Contests
68
Part 3 State Studies of Eugenic Sterilization
93
6 Eugenics and Social Welfare in New Deal Minnesota
117
The Case of North Carolina
141
8 Protection or Control? Womens Health Sterilization Abuse and Relf v Weinberger
161
Part 4 Eugenics in the Human Genome Era
191
9 Are We Entering a Perfect Storm for a Resurgence of Eugenics? Science Medicine and Their Social Context
193
10 Modern Eugenics and the Law
219
List of Contributors
241
Index
243

Eugenic Sterilization in California and Indiana 190779
95

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About the author (2011)

Paul A. Lombardo is Professor of Law at Georgia State University College of Law. He is author of Three Generations, No Imbeciles: Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck v. Bell.

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