An introduction to the literary history of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries

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Printed for T. Cadell jr. and W. Davies, 1798 - Literary Criticism - 272 pages
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Page xvi - ... some respects the arts, had re-appeared before the age of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccace. To them we owe the introduction of classical studies, the first happy imitation of the Roman authors, and what was yet more important, the first successful cultivation of their vernacular tongue. Nor will it be denied that their age was marked by a corresponding progress of rapidity and success in the polite arts. It is this splendid assemblage of merit which has caused theirs to be considered as the exclusive...
Page 90 - The world is sustained by four things only : the learning of the wise, the justice of the great, the prayers of the good, and the valour of the brave.
Page xv - For this seems the proper place to observe, that learning, however defined, the sciences, and in some respects the arts, had re-appeared before the age of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccace. To them we owe the introduction of classical studies, the first happy imitation of the Roman authors, and what was yet more important, the first successful cultivation of their vernacular tongue. Nor will it be denied that their age was marked by a corresponding progress of rapidity and success in the polite arts....
Page xv - ... to which in his opinion the re-appearance of learning may be properly attributed, its dawn in the eleventh, and an increafing radiance in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.
Page xvii - Part is defigned to exhibit a view of the progrefs of learning thus affifted and advanced, during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Hence one chapter is dedicated to a ftatement of thofe political events, to which a literary influence may be properly afcribed, to an account of the patronage of the great, the eftablifhment of univerfities, and the travels of fcholars.
Page v - Johnfon would never allow ; on the contrary, to the aftonifhment of myfelf who have heard him, and many others, he has frequently declared, that the only * Hiftory of the Revival of Learning in Europe, containing an ' account of whatever contributed to the reftoration of literature, ' fuch as controverfies, printing, the deftruction...
Page v - Greek em• pire, the encouragement of great men, with the lives of the moft ' eminent patrons, and moft eminent early profeffors of all kinds of ' learning in different countries.
Page xiv - Part of this trad he ha> endeavoured to give a (hort hiftorical and critical fketch of the decline of learning in the Roman empire, and followed it to a period when its fpirit fubfided, and its very exiftence may be reafonably queftioned. Need he fay he means the tenth century ? Three fhort chapters are em>.
Page 8 - Roman tafte. and literature, which followed the fortunes of his court, would be gradually fuperieded by the addrefs, the arts, and the language of Greece; and how the portion which remained, would fall an inevitable prey to. the encroachments and innovations of barbarifm.
Page 26 - Lactantius has often been compared and once preferred to the first mime in Latin eloquence. St. Ambrose was a learned and powerful composer. To mention the name of St. Jerome is to convey the idea of a laborious, profound, animated, and eloquent author. No one will dispute the merits of St.

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