Canadian Public Budgeting in the Age of Crises: Shifting Budgetary Domains and Temporal Budgeting

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Apr 18, 2013 - Political Science - 288 pages
In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crunch, a pending era of budgetary austerity looms over Canada. Canadian Public Budgeting in the Age of Crises provides a roadmap through the difficult fiscal decisions that have characterized contemporary federal politics across four decades. The authors provide an accessible and comprehensive overview of the constraints that have affected budgetary outcomes in the recent past and that will affect the near future, with analysis spanning micro, macro, social, environmental, and intergenerational domains. They examine the current Harper government's Conservative era, but also look at public budgeting under Chrétien, Mulroney, and Trudeau. Set in the crucial context of macroeconomic policy shifts and in a global comparative context, Canadian Public Budgeting in the Age of Crises broadens and deepens our understanding of government spending, borrowing, and taxing. Budgetary domains - complex realms of fiscal content, choice, and governance - are introduced and balanced against an analysis of these domains with pertinent and up-to-date discussions on institutional influences, dominant actors, and shifting power imbalances.
 

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Contents

Figures and Tables
1951
Academic Foundations and Our Analytical
1964
International and Canadian
1978
Power Politics and Contending Ideas
2004
Diverse Inequality Poverty and Retirement Pension
2023
The Innovation Productivity
1982
Energy Climate Change and Green Industry Crises
1997
Varieties and Intergenerational and Demographic Crises
Budgetary Domains Crises Temporal Varieties and Democratic Reforms
References
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About the author (2013)

G. Bruce Doern is distinguished research professor, School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University and professor, Politics Department, University of Exeter.

Allan M. Maslove is distinguished research professor, School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University.

Michael J. Prince is Lansdowne Professor of Social Policy, Faculty of Human and Social Development, University of Victoria.

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