Curiosities of Glass Making: With Details of the Processes and Productions of Ancient and Modern Ornamental Glass Manufacture

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David Bogue, 1849 - Chromolithography - 146 pages
 

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Page 130 - ... the wind ; which might extend the sight of the philosopher to new ranges of existence, and charm him at one time with the unbounded extent of the material creation, and at another with the endless subordination of animal life ; and, what is yet of more importance, might supply the decays of nature, and succour old age with subsidiary sight. Thus was the first artificer in glass employed, though without his own knowledge or expectation. He was facilitating and prolonging the enjoyment of light,...
Page 20 - The design, and more especially the execution, are truly admirable. The whole of the blue ground — or at least the part below the upper welding of the handle — was originally covered with white enamel, out of which the figures have been sculptured in the style of a cameo, with astonishing skill and labour. Although there cannot exist any doubt as to the materials of which this vase is composed, it is extraordinary that, notwithstanding four authors have agreed in considering it to be stone, all...
Page 1 - OF the manufacture of glass it has been said that, "although perfectly transparent itself, not one of the materials of which it is made partakes of that quality." Its origin is uncertain. Josephus claims the discovery for the Israelites ; Pliny assigns it to the Phoenicians, and states that the first glasshouses were erected in Tyre, where the only staple of the manufacture existed for many ages. Herodotus and Theophrastus likewise confirm the fact of the use...
Page 130 - ... of life, as would in time constitute a great part of the happiness of the world? Yet by some such fortuitous liquefaction was mankind taught to procure a body at once in a high degree solid and transparent, which might admit the light of the sun, and exclude the violence of the wind ; which might extend the sight of the philosopher to new ranges of existence, and charm him at one time with the unbounded extent of the material creation, and at another with the endless subordination of animal life;...
Page 130 - Who, when he saw the first sand or ashes, by a casual intenseness of heat, melted into a metalline form, rugged with excrescences, and clouded with impurities, would have imagined, that in this shapeless lump lay concealed so many conveniences of life, as would in time constitute a great part of the happiness of the world...
Page 3 - ... authority of a painted representation, and deny that the use of glass could be proved on such evidence, it may be well to remind him that images of glazed pottery were common at the same period, that the vitrified substance with which they are covered is of the same quality as glass, and that therefore the mode of fusing, and the proper proportions of the ingredients for making glass, were already known to them ; and we can positively state, that 200 years after, or about 1500 BC, they made ornaments...
Page 23 - Gentlemen ipso facto, and it is not without reason, it being a rare kind of Knowledge and Chymistry to transmute Dust and Sand (for they are the only main Ingredients) to such a diaphanous pellucid dainty Body as you see a Crystal-Glass is...
Page 30 - ... glass, so as to become perfectly imperishable. The substance of which they are composed is less fusible than glass, incapable of generating air, and, at the same time, susceptible of contraction or expansion, as, in the course of manufacture, the glass becomes hot or cold. It may previously be formed into any device or figure, by either moulding or modelling; and may be painted with metallic colours, which are fixed by exposure to a melting heat. The ornaments are introduced into the body of...
Page 30 - The ornaments are introduced into the body of the glass rchile hot, by which tneans the air is effectually excluded, the composition being ac>tually incorporated with the glass. In this way every description of ornamental glass ware may be decorated with embossed white or coloured arms or crests. Specimens of these incrustations have been exhibited, not only in decanters and wine-glasses, but in lamps, girandoles, chimney ornaments, plates, and smelling-bottles. Busts and statues on a small scale,...
Page 11 - ... these parts : it is not improbable, that in the golden age of Egypt, she had communication with the Gold Coast; indeed, it has been thought, and perhaps not without some reason , that the Gold Coast is the Ophir of Solomon...

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