Hermes' Dilemma and Hamlet's Desire: On the Epistemology of Interpretation

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1992 - Social Science - 386 pages
0 Reviews
Vincent Crapanzano here focuses his critical powers upon the interpretive and dialogic strategies of his own culture. In essays that question how the human sciences, particularly anthropology and psychoanalysis, articulate their fields of study, Crapanzano addresses the enormous problem of describing the self in both its individual and collective projections. Treating subjects as diverse as Roman carnivals and Balinese cockfights, circumcision, dreaming, and spirit possession in Morocco, transference in psychoanalysis, self-characterization in teenage girls' gossip, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and Jane Austen's "Emma", dialogue models in hermeneutics, and semantic vertigo in Hamlet's Elsinore, these essays look critically at the inner workings of interpretation in the human sciences and literary study. In modern Western culture's attempts to interpret and communicate the nature of other cultures, Crapanzano finds a crippling crisis in representation. He shows how the quest for knowledge of "exotic" and "primitve" people is often confused with an unexamined need for self-definition, and he sets forth the resulting interpretive paradoxes, particularly the suppression of any awareness of the play of power and desire in such an approach. What is missing from contemporary theories of interpretation is, in Crapanzano's account, a crucial understanding of the role context plays in any act of communication or its representation - in interpretation itself. Although he makes use of theories in hermeneutics and psychoanalysis, Crapanzano's method is ethnographic. By looking at contemporary theories as an ethnologist might view the theories of the people he studies, he aims to invert their processes, and thus to restore a sense of naturalness to our experience of self, dialogue, and cultural exchange.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Centering
27
Hermes Dilemma
43
The Self the Third and Desire
70
SelfCharacterization
91
Text Transference and Indexicality
115
Talking about Psychoanalysis
136
Mohammed and Dawia
155
Dialogue
188
Symbols and Symbolizing
219
Maimed Rites and Wild and Whirling Words
283
Notes
317
References
357
Index
377
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1992)

Vincent Crapanzano is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Comparative Literature at the City University of New York and author of, among other works, The Hamadsha, Tuhami: A Portrait of a Moroccan, and Waiting: The Whites of South Africa.

Bibliographic information